Acebeam E75 Review (Best Flashlight of 2023 so far!)

Subscribers to the channel may have noticed I have been slowing down in reviews a bit, and part of that’s being really selective in what I review. When I saw the Acebeam E75 announced, I knew I wanted to review it, well and let’s just say, I’m not disappointed. The size, LED’s (Nichia 519A available) and UI make this a win in my book, maybe the best of the year so far. Thanks to Acebeam for sending this to me to review, any sales or discounts that are available will be in the description below. 

 

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Packaging & Accessories

I will quickly go over the packaging and accessories that came with my light and then get to what you really want to know. It’s a nice full-color black box with the outline of the light on the front. The side gives a few highlights and the specs of your model, and the back more detailed stats. My light came with 2 spare orings, a charging cover, a generic lanyard, USB-A to C charging cable, and an Acebeam branded 5000mAh protected 15A 21700 li-ion battery, and the standard paperwork. 

 

Construction & Design

The light is currently being offered in aluminum, anodized in 4 colors, Black, Gray, Blue and Dark Green, and I have the dark green model here. Interestingly the photos on Acebeam’s website don’t show a blue model, but 2 shades of green instead, a grass green which is what I have and a teal green seems to be what they are calling blue. 

The light itself has a flat tail, with a very strong magnet and easily holds itself horizontally on painted slick surfaces. The tail cap has nice functional straight knurling. Internally there are springs on both ends and threads on the tail are square-cut. 

The body tube and head are integral and made of one piece of aluminum. The tube has spiral unidirectional knurling. It’s fairly smooth and could be a little more aggressive in my opinion. 4 large flats are milled in to break it up. 

The e-switch has a black aluminum cover, with a clear plastic ring surrounding it. Underneath there are the 4 LED power level indicators. These are multi-color but all behave the same. They are green when the power is greater than 20% remaining, turn red under 20% and blink red when under 10% remaining. One interesting thing to note is the 4 green power level LED’s around the button are always illuminated. This isn’t a big deal during most operations but is less than ideal when in moonlight mode. I have been told there is a revision where the LED indicator brightness will be less. 

The charging port is opposite the button and has a good-fitting silicone cover. I’ll talk more about it and the pocket clip more in their respective sections. 

The front bezel has moderate crenulations that are reasonably sharp. Mine is glued in place and I would guess made of steel. The lens is glass and AR coated, below it is the quad optic and in my case the 4 Nichia 519a LED’s. 

 

UI

The UI here is what I’ll call the standard flashlight UI. It’s one many other manufacturers use and is logical. From off, long press on the button to turn into firefly mode. A short click from firefly will shut it off, and a longer click from Firefly will turn it to low. When already on in the standard modes the longer click will allow it to cycle up through low, med1, med2, and high. Turbo is a double click and strobe is a triple click. Both Turbo and Strobe shortcuts work when the light is off too. To turn off from any mode it’s a simple short click. There is memory on the normal modes, and lockout that can be activated when the light is off by holding the button for 3 seconds, and the unlock is the same procedure. 

 

Retention

The lanyard attachment point on the E75 is on the tail cap, similar to a lot of other lights. It’s sufficient but nothing special. Let’s talk about the clip on this one though. It’s a little different design than I have seen on most other lights. It’s screwed on just under the charging port and runs most of the length of the body. It’s a dual-direction clip but neither is what I would say is great in my opinion. Both directions leave about 1” to 1.75” sticking out of your pocket both of which are more than I would like. With the diameter of this light and clip configuration for me, it’s not going to be an EDC in my front pocket. In a back pocket, it’s ok. There is no included holster which I would like for this size of the light, and something some of the competitor lights includes. 

 

Size & Weight

I measured the length of the e75 at 5.1”, the diameter of the head at 1.38”, and the diameter of the body at 1.04” on the flats. Weight with clip and battery 7.64oz, or 216.7g. Slightly heavier than the Olight Seeker 3 Pro at 7oz or 198.9g. 

 

Here are a few size comparisons with similar lights that I own. 

 

LED & Beam

The Acebeam E75 is available with 2 LED options, a cool white 6500k option that’s not specified officially producing a peak of 4500k, and a neutral white Nichia 519a option which is what I have here. On my Opple meter, I measured the Nichia 519a LED’s at 4701k tint and at a 98Ra (CRI). Both are excellent and my personal preference, there was nothing negative to measure with the DUV here either. PWM was not to be found here as it’s a constant current driver.

 

The beam shape coming out of the quad LED’s isn’t perfect. On my Nichia version, there is some flower petal effects going on, at about 5ft or further though these are very minimal and not something thats a big deal. What you do notice is that the spill isn’t round, but the center is fairly round. I would put this as more of a floody light than thrower, but not pure flood. 

 

Outputs

Here is an output chat, and it’s nice Acebeam includes measurements for both LED’s not something all manufacturers do these days. Moonlight through High I saw numbers that were reasonably close to the claimed numbers at the 30-second mark (FL1 standard). Turbo on my homemade TexasAce lumen tube read low, and this is a trend i’m seeing above 3000 lumens. It’s something I’m going to have to investigate further. 

 

Heat & Runtime

Runtimes came in at what was expected for the most part. You can see that turbo starts stepping down at the 1-minute mark over the next minute before being at the 1000-lumen mark. Heat peaks at the end of the first step down out at the 1:33:00 mark at 54C .Starting in turbo and running to exhaustion ends at 4:10:00 which is pretty solid. You get 93 minutes of runtime on high of around 1000 lumens. Skipping turbo and going straight to high doesn’t yield much more only about 7 more minutes in high and 18 more minutes in overall runtime. Medium 2 lasted a total of nearly 7 hours runtime. The lack of a rubber grip here does make it a little toasty if you heat peak temps but it’s only after running for 90 minutes continuously, assuming you are not spamming turbo.

 

Recharging

The E75 uses onboard USB-C recharging and I had no issues with any of the cables or charges I used. PD support was good. The included cell is a 15A cell model number IMR21700NP-500A, is a button top, long, and protected. I measured it at 75.29mm, and my longer battery from my brass E70 worked fine which is even longer. Most button-top cells should be fine here, but not the ones with dual pole contacts on one end. 

Charging time in my test took 3:10:00 from LVP at 3.009v to full at 4.134v. During this time charging speed hit a maximum of 2A with a pretty substantial ramp down beginning at the 2 hour mark. One note on the termination voltage. The 4.134v is when the lights voltage indicators went from red flashing to green solid. If you leave it plugged in it will trickle charge a bit closer to 4.2v. 

 

Conclusion

My conclusion on the Acebeam e75 is that it’s my favorite light of 2023 that I have tested so far. For me the combination of the slightly warm, neutral, high CRI Nichia 519a LED’s, solid beam pattern, and 21700 battery provides a long runtime, and it’s available in green, one of my favorite colors. It’s got an easy UI too without any negatives, and no proxy sensor. This is a form factor I like too, and it’s a step up over the Olight Seeker 3 Pro which has the cool white LED, proxy sensor, and a UI I’m not hugely fond of. 

 

The clip on the E75 isn’t my favorite, and it’s not going to be a front-pocket EDC for that reason. It also doesn’t come with a holster which is unfortunate, but it does fit in the Olight Seeker 3 holsters. You could also argue it’s price might be a little high if you’re comparing it to something like the D4V2 which is a similar size and performance but if you’re comparing it to the Olight Seeker 3 Pro or Seeker 4 it’s in line with the competition. 

 

For me the pro’s outweigh the cons, and this ticks a lot of boxes for me for a general-purpose flashlight especially if you value high CRI, warm/neutral emitters like I do. It’s eays for me to recommend the E75. 

Acebeam H16 Review – (Nichia 519a, 650 lumens, Dual Fuel)

Today I am taking a look at the newest right angle headlamp from Acebeam with the H16. It’s a single emitter light with 2 available LED options, in the AA/14500 size format. The H16 shares a lot of design and functions with the similarly sized Pokelite AA that I have reviewed last year. Thanks to Acebeam for sending this one to me to look at and review. Any discounts or deals that I have for this light will be posted in the description below this video along with links to my social media pages. 

 

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See the H16 on Acebeam’s website https://www.acebeam.com/h16

 

Packaging & Accessories

The packaging is a white retail box with color photos and highlights of the light on the front, there are no technical specs on the back like you commonly see, just contact info for Acebeam. The light and accessories sit inside a plastic tray inside and it comes with the light itself, and Acebeam branded 900mAh 14500 battery with USB-C charging on board, a short USB-A to C charging cable, the headband, 2 extra orings, and user manual. 

 

Construction & Design

The light is made from aluminum and hard anodized in either a black or gray color. The black which I have here is the high CRI option and it’s only available in black. The gray body color is exclusive to the cool white emitter too. The design characteristics are pretty similar with the Pokelit AA model with a few differences. 

The tail cap is flat and has a strong magnet that easily holds up the light. It features nice knurling for grip for easy battery removal. The body tube has ribs in the center and places for the clip to mount at the front or rear. The body tube itself is glued to the head of the light.

The head has some fins cut opposite the emitter for heat dissipation. The electronic switch is sitting at the top of the head and is covered by a shallow rubber/silicon boot that’s smooth. The business end of the light has a shallow bezel, glass lens, and smooth reflector. Markings on the light are pretty minimal, with the CCT and CRI being marked on the side of the head, the brand and model being marked just under the bezel, and the export and battery marks on the bottom of the cap.

 

User Interface

The UI here is very simple with the electronic switch found on top of the head. With the 14500 battery, you have 3 modes without memory mode. Click and hold to come on in the lowest mode or double press from off to turn on in low.. Once on click and hold to go up in mode groups. Double click to turbo when on and triple click to a slow strobe. Single short click to turn off. It’s a very simple user interface that I think anyone can understand. Mechanical lockout is easy to trigger by just breaking the seal on the tail cap.

 

Retention

The Clip is an uncaptured dual-direction pocket clip that can mount two ways on the H16. You can mount it near the rear of the light to give you a very deep carry, since the clip actually goes past the end of the light. The downside of this is the button will be inside the pocket and in my opinion easier to accidentally trigger, although it does still require a long press to turn on and comes on in low. The other place it mounts is hear the head but a fair amount of the light will stick out when doing this.

The H16 comes with an orange elastic 2 strap headband. It has a nice comfortable silicone mount, but requires the clip to be removed before mounting. On the sides you do have some reflective markings and Acebeam branding, holes in the material for style and ventilation, and then on the inside you have silicone grip strips to help it keep in place on a helmet. I found it to be lightweight and comfortable to wear.

 

LED & Beam

The H16 I have here is using a Nichia 519A LED in neutral white. I measured this LED at 4912k and 97.9Ra on my Opple light meter, without any color casts in the DUV data. The beam here is fairly floody with a large well defined hotspot and not a ton of spill. Good for the application here, as it’s optimized for closer-up use. There is some PWM that I could measure on my meter when on High but it’s very fast and I can’t see it with my eyes. 

 

Output

Since this light is dual fuel and will run on both a Liion or NiMH battery, I will give some output data for both. One thing to note here is that light is available with a different LED that is brighter if you wish but you do give up the neutral tint and high CRI. All measurements were taken at the 30-second mark according to FL1 Standards. In general on the Li-ion battery that I measured on my Texas Ace Lumen tube was lower than Acebeam’s claims. If I had to guess they are listing startup lumens, not FL1 standards. For my Alkaline/NIMH tests, I used an Amazon Basics high-capacity AA battery. Acebeam doesn’t give official outputs for the use of this light with Alkaline or NiMH, and I think thats due to the extremely low outputs in the first 3 modes. The only one I got to give me a solid reading was medium at about 2 lumens. The light is only really useful on Turbo and that steps down pretty quickly which I will get to in the Runtime section coming up soon. My advice would be to stick with the Li-ion battery the light comes with and really only use a AA or NiMH in an emergency situation. 

 

Heat & Runtimes

I focused primarily on the heat and runtime on the H16 when using the included Li-ion 14500 battery since that’s really where the light is best. Turbo lasts for 2 minutes to complete the total stepdown to about 180 lumens while staying above 500 lumens for the first 55 seconds. From here it’s a pretty steady decline and looks to be somewhat unregulated. Peak heat was at 18 minutes at about 48C on the exterior of the light. High output is an almost identical runtime, with the only difference being a few more total minutes of runtime. 

The NiMH on turbo mode the H16 has a pretty minimal output time of less than a minute before stepping down to about 35 lumens. It will run at this state for about 9:10:00, and then continue to run past 24 hours at sub-lumen outputs. This really isn’t very effective light in most situations though. 

 

Recharging

While the H16t itself doesn’t have built-in charging, the optional Acebeam 14500 battery does have built-in charging via USB-C. I had no issues charging this via USB-C to C or PD. Charging here is at 0.5C about .45A at the maximum for most of the charging time. The overall charging time is 2:30:00 at which time the LED on the battery itself goes from red to green. The battery itself has LVP built into it. I measured LVP at 3.103v and full at 4.174v on the Liion. The NiMH measured 1.23v when the light shut off. 

 

Conclusion

The Acebeam H16 Fishing Headlamp is a decent light if you’re looking for small form factor, neutral white and high CRI. Just be aware that it doesn’t have the most output nor can it sustain those larger numbers for that long. I don’t think this is an issue as long as your use case is up close needs. I would recommend the headlamp for more specialized applications where light weight and size is of high importance. I wouldn’t recommend this headlamp if you plan to run it with a AA or NiMH batter. It’s performance and output runtime is really optimized for Li-Ion batteries. I would only use AA or NiMH in times of emergency. Keep in mind this does come in a different LED model where you can get up to 1000 lumens on turbo too if you’re needing a bit more output. 

Thrunite Catapult Mini V2 Review (1100 Lumens, 515 Meters of throw, 18350)

Today I’m taking a look at the new Thrunite Catapult Mini V2. Now if you have watched my channel for a while you will know I really liked the original Catapult Mini and it’s probably my go to small thrower flashlight so I was excited when Thrunite said they had an updated model coming out. It’s using an SFT40 LED that’s brighter than the original light and a different optic setup, so lets see if it’s an improvement or not. Thanks to Thrunite for sending this to me to look at and review.

 

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Desert Tan https://amzn.to/3oD2ee6 use code LXDG4Y7L to save 15%

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Packaging & Accessories

Standard Thrunite packaging here, the signature brown cardboard box with just the logo on the front and the line drawing on the side, opposite that is the indicator for the body color and LED tint. Inside the light is nicely protected with black foam. Accessories are the light itself, USB-A to C Charging cable, proprietary 18350 1100mAh battery, and a bag of extra o’rings, button, recharging port, and branded lanyard.

 

Construction & Design

V2 shares some similar design characteristics with V1 in roughly the same shapes but with a little different style. The light is made from 6061 aluminum and is available in two colors currently, a standard black and a Desert Tan that I have here. The V2 is slightly longer by about 4.5mm in length. The V2 to me feels more like most of the recent Thrunite Designs with a lanyard attachment point on the flat tail, allowing the light to tail stand. The grip on the body is a combination of very fine-milled lines, and then 5 milled flats around the side. The head has the standard Thrunite flat metal button with an LED Battery indicator in the middle and a standard USB Port cover opposite that. That head grows in size with a cone and a more traditional flat screw-off bezel that’s not glued in place. The V2 is using a traditional smooth deep reflector where as the V1 used a TIR-style optic and this has a pretty big difference in the beam pattern as we will see later. 

 

Retention

Retention options here are limited, as the light doesn’t have a clip, nor comes with a holster. It does come with a lanyard that attaches to the tail if you wish. The light does tailstand but that’s less useful with a thrower like this in my opinion. I do like the size of the light in my hand, and find it pretty comfortable to use. The tail is nonmagnetic.

 

Size & Weight

I measured the length at 85.81mm, the diameter of the head at 40.4mm, diameter of the body at 26mm. Weight with the battery installed came to 4.06oz. The light is drop rated to 1.5M, and waterproof to 2M (IPX8). Here is a photo comparing it to the Catapult Mini V1 and the Lumintop GT Nano all small form factor throwers. 

 

LED & Beam

The Catapult Mini V2 is using a SFT40 LED that I measured on my Opple meter at 5835k and 65 CRI, so more on the cool white spectrum and low CRI. DUV had no undesirable tints to it. This LED is combined with a traditional smooth reflector where as the V1 used a unique TIR style optic. The result is the beam patterns are quite different. Where the V1 was all throw, and basically no spill, the V2 has a very bright hot center (with a bit of a donut at closer ranges), and a bit of spill. This makes the V2 somewhat better as more of a general-purpose light rather than only a thrower. 

 

V2

 

V1

 

Outputs

Outputs here on the Catapult Mini V2 were generally higher then claimed when measured on my TexasAce lumen tube at the 30 second mark. This isn’t something I mind at all, a nice little benefit.

One other thing to note here on outputs is the candela rating or throw, the V1 was rated at 89,600 candela and 598 meters of throw. The V2 is rated at 66,150 candela and 515 meters of throw, so slightly less throw than the outgoing model, but you are giving that up for a bit more spill to make the light a little more useful as well as a brighter output in all modes.

 

Heat & Runtime

I will let the graphs do the majority of the talking here on this section. Turbo runtime lasts 90 seconds in my testing, stepping down to 400 lumens. This corresponds to the thermals that I measured on the outside of the light at 34C. It was able to run at this level for 1:20:00, with peak heat increasing to about 39C on the outside of the light. Skipping turbo and just going with high nets you another 6 minutes of total runtime, and running on just medium gives you 3:30:00 of total runtime.

 

User Interface

The Catapult Mini V2 is using Thrunight’s standard UI that they use with basically all of their lights. It has 3 modes during normal operations and shortcuts to Firefly and Turbo. To get to Firefly from off, just long press for about 1 second. For Turbo double press in any mode, and for strobe triple press. For the main modes once on just long press to cycle between them. The light does have memory and will remember only the main modes. There are 2 lockout methods with the light, first is electronic lockout which you can do by long pressing the button for 4 seconds when off, and the same to unlock it. The LED will breathe fading in and out when it’s locked out with this method. Or my personal favorite is just to mechanically lock it out by slightly unscrewing the body from the head to break contact. 

 

Recharging & Power

The Catapult Mini V2 comes with a Thrunite branded semi-proprietary 1100mAh 18350 battery. I tested this battery at 1181mAh in my Vapcell S4 Plus charger. What makes the battery proprietary is the plastic ring around the positive contact on the battery and the fact that there is both positive and negative contacts on the positive end. However, the Catapult Mini V2 only uses positive contact meaning a button top 18350 that’s long enough works here too.

Using the onboard USB-C charging port I was able to charge the light from LVP at 2.903V to full at 4.191V in 3 hours 3 minutes. Now this is a pretty slow charging speed of about 0.5A and only about 1/2C. So it’s super conservative given the battery capacity. I had no issues here charging with a USB-C PD charger either. 

 

Conclusion

I think it’s debatable if the Catapult Mini V2 is really an upgrade here, while it is brighter, and the beam is more useful as a general-purpose flashlight, it’s slightly not as good as the original at being a thrower, which was what is so impressive about the original. That said the V2 is more useful daily because of the spill and the throw is nearly as far. The SFT40 has a slightly cool white tint with no negative tints which is nice to see. 

 

I do like the design of the V2 light slightly better with the improved grip and lanyard attachment points. The rest is pretty similar and unchanged. While I am a little disappointed a proprietary battery shipped with the light, i’m glad it’s not required to function and that normal small button, button top works here or a standard battery with a magnet if needed.

I can definitely recommend picking up a Catapult mini, now which version I think comes down to how you plan to use it, and the V2 for me probably gets the slight edge over V1 just because it is more useful in more scenarios with the increase in spill. That said let me know what you guys think is the better light to go with and why in the comments below. If I have any discounts those will be in the description of the video along with links to my socials. 

 

Get the Thrunite Catapult Mini V2 at Amazon with the links below.

Desert Tan https://amzn.to/3oD2ee6 use code LXDG4Y7L to save 15%

Black https://amzn.to/3N1xbln Click the coupon on the page to save 15%