Thrunite T1S Review ($30, 1212 Lumens, 18350)

Thrunite has updated their small EDC offering with the T1S, it features an 18350 battery, SST40 LED, and is said to produce up to 1200 lumens. They have updated the design a bit, added USB-C charging, and a new TIR Optic. Thanks to Thrunite for sending it to me to review. 

 

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Packaging & Accessories

Packaging is standard Thrunite here, Not much to explain that the pictures won’t answer. You do get the note to remove the battery isolator before using the light, a key point for new users. Accessories you get with the T1S are a 1100mAh 18350 battery, lanyard, extra oring, snap on pocket clip, and a USB-A to USB-C charging cable. 

 

Construction & Design

The T1S is made from aluminum, and anodized in a semi shiny black. Fit and finish is good, above average for this price point I would say. Everything feels good, threads are anodized. The tail is flat, with a magnet inside. The clip attaches at the rear only, more on that later. The body is has 3 smooth sides, and 3 sides with small shallow slots milled into them for grip and style. The head is slightly larger, with minimal fins to dissipate heat. The electronic switch sits on a shallow platform which helps make it indexable, it has LED’s under to server as power indicators too. Opposite the button is the USB-C charging port, with standard silicone rubber cover. 

Internally there is a spring and magnet at the tail, and a brass post up front. Tolerances here are good, the battery is slip fit and the light can run standard flat top or button top cells from whomever you choose. Nothing is proprietary.

 

Retention

The T1S comes with the same pocket clip that the T1 had, this is a press fit on the rear only. It has a bit of a step in it and the top of the loop is small both of which are not my favorite, but works well here and carries super deep. It’s a dual direction clip so it can clip onto a hat well too. Don’t forget the tail is magnetic too.

 

Size, Weight, and Comparison

I measured the length of the T1S at 69.3mm, minimum diameter at 22.2mm, maximum diameter at 26mm at the button in the head. Weight with the battery and clip installed was 2.47oz, or 70.1g. Size wise it’s extremely similar to the original Thrunite T1. When I compare it to the Olight Baton 3, it’s longer and larger in diameter, and that’s expected given the different batteries the two run. The T1S is IPX8 water rated.

 

LED & Beam

The T1S is running a SST-40 in Cool White. When tested with my Opple meter, I received an unscientific 5375k tint in turbo, and 5230k in high. Ra value is somewhere in the 60s. What my eye saw was in the lower modes there is a significant amount of green tint shift that disappears in the higher modes. 

The optic here makes all the difference in my opinion, the T1 was a traditional reflector but super short, the result was all flood. The T1S has a TIR optic so you get a very useful balanced beam for EDC tasks, a reasonably large hotspot with most of the beam intensity and some spill. One thing to note is the TIR is concave, plastic, and doesn’t have a glass lens on top. Not a big deal at this price point, but expect it to get scratched some with use.

 

Official Outputs

 

Runtime & Heat

Turbo output on the light is rated at 1212 lumens for 5 minutes, but in my test I really only saw that for about 2:30 before that stepdown started. It was a slow stepdown that took about 10 minutes to reach around 30% relative output where it ran for an additional hour before running at its low/firefly modes for the remaining 3 hours or so for a total of 3:20:00. Max heat during that time was 50C. I then ran a runtime in medium mode where it was extremely stable and outdid the rated runtime out to 6:30:00.

 

UI

The Thrunite T1S has the pretty standard flashlight UI from Thrunite. From off, long hold to get to firefly mode, when off a single click turns on in the last standard mode used. Long press when on to cycle through the 3 main modes. Double click to go to turbo, triple click to go to strobe. This is simple and definitly an improvement over the slow ramping UI of the original T1. 

 

Recharging

The light recharges via the onboard USB-C that’s opposite the main switch. It is USB-C PD Compatible which is great to see. When recharging the button on the light turns red and turns blue when charged. Maximum charging speed I saw with the included 1100mAh battery was about 0.6A which is conservative. Total charging time from LVP at 3.033V to full at 4.144v was 2:20:00. One other note is that the light uses a standard 18350 battery, I was able to swap in a flat top Vapcell or Keeppower brand battery without problem here. 

 

Final Thoughts

If you were looking for a small EDC light, with USB-C charging, and a non proprietary battery, the Thrunite T1S is a great place to look. At an MSRP of $40, but with a $10 off currently the Thrunite T1S is a bargain at just under $30 and remember that includes the 1100mAh battery and USB-C charging cable. That’s a great bargain for what you’re getting, and fast shipping from the USA. If you’re looking for a new EDC light in this form factor that’s small and don’t mind the greener tint’s at lower outputs, I can recommend the T1S. Hopefully when the chip shortage eases we will see some neutral white emitters and other body colors soon. Thanks for watching or reading.

 

Pickup the Thrunite T1S on Amazon on the links below. For the discount click the coupon on the page.

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Olight I3T Plus & Obuddy Review (Black Friday Deals Start Tonight)

Today I have 2 reviews to show you of some of the new Olight products for the month of November, and tell you about this month’s flash sale. First I have the i3T Plus, a new Penlight from Olight, then the Obuddy, an accessory for your Obulb, the next video in a few days will be of the Parrot, a new knife design from Olight. 

 

I will remind you now the flash sale starts November 24th at 8pm EST so you can shop before Thanksgiving and Black Friday. My link which helps support the channel will be in the description below if you’re interested. Everything I am looking at here and several other things like the new Baldr Pro R, Javelot Pro 2 and others are on sale, at the best prices, along with extras, new customer bonuses etc. Make sure you do log in to your account to get a free i1R pro and take part in the daily drawings. 

 

If I have any other black Friday and Cyber Monday sales from various flashlight brands I will post them on Social media and on my YouTube page too, so make sure you give all of that a follow. 

 

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Pickup the I3T Plus, OBuddy and all the other models at https://bit.ly/OlightLQ the flash sale starts Nov 24th at 8pm EST. 

 

10% OFF Coupon code: LQ10 Coupon Code will work during sales on non-sale listings only.

 

I3T Plus

Olight has listened to it’s fans and has made a pen light! It’s based of the i3T and called the i3T Plus. It uses 2 AAA batteries in series and sees a bump in output. For the flash sale it’s available in black which I have here and blue.

 

Watch this review on YouTube: 

Packaging & Accessories

Since I know some of you guys want to see the packaging I will insert some photos, it’s pretty what you expect from the i3T/i5T families of lights. The light does ship with 2x Alkaline AAA batteries. Long timer viewers will know my opinion about these, just toss them in your remotes and throw in some rechargeables NIMH so you don’t ever have to deal with leaking cells.

 

Construction & Retention

The light is made from aluminum and nicely anodized. It comes in at 2.19oz with batteries so pretty light but heavier than some of the competition, and it’s 5.24 inches long. I will throw in a few photos compared with other pen lights I have like the Thrunite Ti4, Lumintop IYP365, and Royvon Aurora A33 I reviewed earlier in the year. You can see length wise it sits in the middle here. 

As far as physical features it’s basically an i3T with a longer battery tube, same nicely textured raised tail switch, same deep spiral in the body, same plastic optic and lens. It’s solid feeling in the hand and pocket. The clip here is the same as the i3T, and not captured. It’s reasonably deep carry and works well as an EDC in a front pants pocket or shirt pocket. 

 

LED & Beam & Runtime

No specific LED is mentioned here, it’s a cool white, but more neutral, and I don’t have any green tint like I do with my copper and aluminum i3T’s. It has a plastic TIR type optic here, same as the i3T. The candela is listed as 1240, and it is ipx8 water rated. 

I know it’s popular to put 10440 batteries into the i3T. I didn’t do that here, because I am concerned running the LED at around 8.4V vs the designed 3V will blow cause problems with the LED or Driver circuit and I don’t want to ruin my light. The light is designed to run on Alkaline, NiMH rechargeables and Lithium Iron batteries.

 

Runtimes here are pretty substantial. On high it runs for 1 minute at 250 lumens before stepping down to 100 lumens for 8 hours. At the end it will flash on and off slowly to let you know the batteries are low. In low mode it will run at 15 lumens for 28 hours. I ran my tests off 2 Amazon Basics NiMH cells and got similar numbers. One thing that’s a bit disappointing is that timed step down of the 250 lumens. Heat isn’t an issue, I wish it was longer. 

 

UI

UI here is the same as the smaller i3T, with 2 modes, allowing for a half press or full press to switch between them. The light starts out in low always, and there is a nice slow ramp up when going to high and then stepping down. When the light is running out of the power it will flash to let you know power levels are getting low. 

 

Conclusion

If you like the i3T but want more runtime this is your light, it’s basically just a stretch i3T. Most everything else here is the same. This is a good answer to those that have been asking for a Penlight from Olight, but it’s not exactly creative in terms of design, emitters, or power source. I am sure it will be popular though and I have no issues with it but I do have a wishlist for future versions. 

 

Personally I would have liked them to go more the route of  the Royvon Aurora A33 with liion battery and emitter choices (Neutral or warm tints please) but maybe we can save that for an i4T R or something like that. It would be great to see a high CRI option here too, since any hit in output is ok since this is  a close range light and good color rendering is really useful in many pen light situations. 

 

This one will be 25% off during the black Friday flash sale and available in black and blue colors. It’s also part of a few different bundles that you can see on OlightStore.com

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OBuddy

I think the OBuddy might be my favorite non flashlight thing Olight has come out. It’s an accessory to any of the  3 generations of OBulb. The OBuddy is a soft silicone white and blue spaceman model, and the OBulb goes where his head is. I think it looks kind of like the Reddit spaceman logo if you know what that’s like. 

The OBulb magnetically drops into place for his head, and that’s because on the back where his backpack is, it is designed to connect your MCC charger to charge up your OBulb. If you have the new OBulb MCS then you can use this to plug in your light and activate the motion sensor. I am demoing it with the sapphire blue OBulb MC, which has RGB LED’s inside to to do multicolor, and it comes with googly eyes in the package too which is a great addition to give your spaceman so me character. The OBuddy also works with other lights like the Baton 3 if you wanted. 

If you have kids, especially kids who love the OBulb like many do, this one is a no brainer to pick up during the flash sale, it’s only $7.96. I plan to pick up another for a stocking stuffer for sure. Even if you don’t have kids I could see a lot of people putting this on a shelf, desk or even car dashboard. It’s so simple but it’s a hit for me, I really like it. For me this might be the best item of this flash sale, it’s creative and was totally unexpected. I could totally see Olight brining out some special editions in different colors, and maybe we will get a larger version with a internal battery to give the OBulb some extra life. 

———————————–

 

My next video in a few days will be of the Olight Parrot, a new knife design from Olight and Kizer.

Don’t forget all the many models of lights available for sale during this flash sale which starts November 24th at 8pm EST. There is the Baton 3 4 seasons editions with special materials, designs and colors, Warrior x 3 in OD Green, Baldr Pro R, the new Javelot Pro 2, The Parrot and Begal knives, as well as tons of bundle deals with many existing models, in new colors too. Links to the sale will be in the description below, and if your watching this after the flash sale don’t forget my code LQ10 will save you 10% off any regularly priced item. 

 

Pickup the I3T Plus, OBuddy and all the other models at https://bit.ly/OlightLQ the flash sale starts Nov 24th at 8pm EST. 

 

10% OFF Coupon code: LQ10 Coupon Code will work during sales on non-sale listings only.

 

Acebeam E70 Brass Review (95+ CRI, GT-FC40 LED, 21700)

Today I am taking a look at the Acebeam E70 in Brass. This is one of the many variants of the Acebeam E70 that have been made, in many different materials, a few colors, and with LED choices. The one I have here has a new special high CRI large format LED which I will talk about here later on in the review. Acebeam sent this one to me as a gift, but I decided I would do a review for you guys too as this one is pretty cool I think.

 

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https://youtu.be/fy3vVufv5WQ

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Packaging and Accessories

A few notes on the versions of this light, you can go for a black anodized aluminum version, as well as Copper, Stainless Steel, a bead blasted or rainbow titanium and a polished brass which I have here. 

The packaging is a nice cardboard white box, with clear plastic window showing the light itself. In the case of the brass light it came sealed in a vacuum sealed bag, which I opened before I took pictures (a cardinal sin of flashlight reviewing). Acebeam sells this light with and without a battery, but everything else is included. A lanyard, manual, warranty card, and warning card, a Lanyard, extra orings, a felt drawstring bag, and a USB cable allowing you to use to charge the optional battery and use it as a powerbank.

 

Construction

Instead of covering everything on the design here I want to hit the highlights while you look at all the photos I have taken of the light. So somethings to note, the tail is flat so it tail stands well, on my version the electronic button in the rear is brass but this is normally stainless steel on the aluminum version.

The light uses a dual tube design, and they have chosen to mill out areas of the body tube to see the inner anodized aluminum blue tube. This creates a pretty unique look for a production light. It’s also a dirt trap, so probably not the light I would choose to go camping with but fun none the less. The body tube also has a place for 6 small tritium tubes milled, which isn’t seen commonly on production lights.

Threads are square cut and work well, although I had minor issues starting them on this light repeatedly. The head itself has holes drilled for style mainly and I like this look. The bezel is does unscrew and is quite sharp around the outer edges. The lens is mineral glass and the reflector has an orange peel. The internal connection points such as the springs are gold plated. 

 

Size & Weight

The E70 is a medium sized 21700 light, with length coming in at a measured 128mm in length, 30.2mm in diameter at the head. Weight with the battery was quite heavy on this brass model at 284.8g or 10.04oz. 

 

Retention

The light features a standard clip design with 2 screws, so your popular aftermarket clips will fit here. Kind of unique are the 3 predrilled locations for the clip. The stock clip is good but a little thin in my opinion for this lights weight. The front bezel is also pretty sharp, so I would personally think twice about EDCing this one inside a pants pocket, but it works great in a bag instead. 

LED & Beam

There are 3 LED options available in most but not all of the E70 varients. The base models use a Cree XHP 70.2 LED in either 5000k or 6500k at 70 CRI. Optionally on many but not all of the models there is a new Getian GT-FC40 LED at 4500k producing 95 CRI which is what I have. This required a driver change as well as this LED runs off of 12V instead of the 6V for the Cree. You take a decrease in performance though with the High CRI option at 2800 lumens instead of the 4000 the XHP 70.2 produces. 

The beam is a hot round center with some tint shift a rosy corona out into the spill. At distances this is mostly a flood light with the orange peel reflector and the massive doamless LED. It’s more pleasant to use in my opinion then a mule style flood since it does have a bit of optic but it’s not a thrower. Quite nice for normal tasks. 

 

Heat and Runtimes

I did my runtime testing with the optional Acebeam branded 5000mAh battery. Output on the GT-FC40 LED in my light here is somewhere between 2500-3000 lumens in turbo, and step down came at 1 minute and seems timed. It then ran at 35% relative output for 90 minutes, stepping down a few more times for total output at a little over 2 hours. While this is producing a lot of light, it’s certainly not the most efficient LED or driver combination I have seen. It also produces a significant amount of heat, that builds over time with this light in a pretty linear fashion. You are going to want gloves or turn it down for sustained use, max heat was at 1:30:00 at a crazy 84.9C (185 F). 

 

UI

The UI here took me a few times to get used to, but the more I use it, it’s become a good UI that builds in an element of safety. To turn the light on you can double press the tail switch to turn the light on in low, the light does have memory so if it’s recent it will turn on in the last mode used excluding turbo. Once on, long press and hold to advance into the 4 available modes. Double press to turbo, triple to strobe. The light also has moon light mode which you can access from off by long pressing, as well as lockout. Lastly to turn off it’s a simple quick press to turn off. This seems to be a change over previous versions of the E70.

 

Recharging

Charging is not built into this light. Acebeam sells an optional 21700 battery for an additional cost that has a USB-C plug on it. Recharging this cell took  2:07:00 to charge. You can use standard cells inside the E70, but you need to use a longer cell, like something that’s protected or a tall button top. 

 

Conclusion

My conclusion on the Acebeam E70 is it’s a nice higher end model of production flashlight with a lot of nice features that have been well thought out. I love that Acebeam continues to offer LED tint choices, and on this model different versions of LED’s. For an application like this I will take the GT-FC40 LED every day over a XHP 70.2, especially when I can get a warmer tint and high CRI. 

 

The brass and copper versions of this light are quite heavy with a battery, so if you were planning to use this as an EDC I would get one of the lighter versions like Titanium or even the Aluminum which also happens to be the most economical. I like that they included a standard clip configuration here so if you want you can further customize the light. I wish they offered a smooth bezel in the box too, this would make EDC in a front pocket a more pleasant experience. That said this is a bigger light and not one you will probably find me EDCing in my pants pocket often as a result. I will use it often for going on walks, etc. 

I can recommend this one without reservations, especially with the GT-FC40 emitter, it’s got a wonderful tint in my opinion and produces enough lumens for most tasks. That said it does get quite hot, but this isn’t because of the LED choice itself. 

 

Pickup the Acebeam E70 at https://bit.ly/Acebeam

Thrunite Catapult Mini Review (680 Lumens, 89,000 Candela, 18350)

Today I have a shortened review of the new Thrunite Catapult Mini, a handheld thrower running an Osram LED and a 18350 battery. While not super bright in number off lumens, the light really throws well for its very small size. Thanks to Thrunite for sending this to me to take a quick look at and review.

 

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Get the Thrunite Catapult Mini on Amazon (Save 20% by clicking the coupon on the page)

Gray https://amzn.to/3ma0JAD

Black https://amzn.to/3yEHWAA

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Accessories

Packaging is the standard Thrunite box. Here is a photo of all the accessories the light comes with. It’s nice to see them include the spare button and port covers still, that’s not something every manufacture is still doing in 2021. 

 

Short overview of construction

The Catapult mini is available in 2 colors black and gray, and I have gray here. It’s made from 6061 T6 aluminum and nicely anodized. Despite it’s small size, they didn’t skimp out on machining quality. The light separates into 3 pieces easily, and it does stand on it’s flat, non magnetic tail. The body tube has the squares milled into it like we saw on the Thrunite TT20 but deeper, and it’s non reversible. 

The body head section uses the standard Thrunite button with LED indicator in the center, and USB-C charging port opposite with a silicone cover. The head itself is the largest part of the light, with a small flat bezel. The bezel does unscrew easily to remove the lens and optic, which should make this light fairly easy to mod if you wish. 

The Lens itself is covered by glass, with a plastic TIR style optic below. This optic reminds me of some of them I have seen on some of my larger Acebeams as well, it helps diffuse the beam a bit but still create that nice hot center and throw. 

 

Comparison with other lights

LED & Beam

The light is using an Osram KW.CSLNM1.TG in Cool white, but to my eyes it’s definitely more neutral than cold. The beam is extremely focused, it has the slightest amount of spill that fades very smoothly without artifacts. It’s a great beam profile for a mini thrower. No PWM was observed on any of the 5 modes.

 

Outputs are listed officially at 

  • Turbo – 680 Lumens
  • High – 235 Lumens
  • Medium – 96 Lumens
  • Low – 21 Lumens
  • Firefly – 0.5 Lumens
  • Strobe – 680 Lumens
  • 89,600 Candela

Night Shots

Heat and Runtime

Turbo on this light lasted for 1 minute before step down, maximum temp was reached at 1:30 at 35C so it gets warm pretty quickly but not in the danger zone. From there the light steps down to about 35% relative output where it will run for 2 hours before running in firefly mode for another 30 minutes or so. Total runtime was 2:30:00. Nothing here surprising. 

 

UI & Recharge

The UI here is standard Thrunite, 3 main modes with firefly at the bottom, and turbo at the top with memory for the main modes. Long press from off to access firefly, double click to access turbo, triple click to access strobe. 

Recharging is accomplished with the onboard USB-C port. It is incompatible with C to C charging or PD charging and requires an A to C charging cable that’s supplied. This is disappointing in 2021. Charging is on the conservative time, it took 2 hours even to charge the included 1100mAh 18350 battery from LVP at 3.035V to full at 4.145v. Total charge rate was about 0.6A. While charging you can use all modes on the light.

One quick note about the battery, it has the positive and negative terminal on the one end of the battery like you see with many brands these days. However in this case you don’t actually need it to use or charge the battery in the light. That’s great news. I tested with a flat top unprotected Keeppower battery and had no issues.

Conclusion

Pocket thrower flashlights seem to be the popular type this year. I found the Thrunite Catapult Mini to be a good performer, especially for it’s size. While not the brightest in terms of lumens it really does throw impressively. I seem to say this a lot but non flashlight people will be impressed with how far you can reach with such a small light. I remember using a 6D Cell Maglight as a kid because it could go so far, it was huge and weighed a ton. This little light outperforms it in all ways, at a pretty affordable price. 

 

I do wish Thrunite would go back to offering more Neutral and even Warm LED tints when they launch new products. They were one of the only manufactures doing this but have seemed to get away from it recently. That said I would call the tint here pretty neutral, so about perfect despite the box saying cool white. 

 

I like the Thrunite Catapult Mini and can recommend it. Everyone needs a pocket thrower, and this is a good choice thats a lot of fun, and comes in a color other then black, if you want that. Thrunite has good customer support too should you ever need it, and best yet it’s on sale for around the $40 price point at the time of filming this video. So if your interested please check the link in the description to see where you can purchase it at. 

 

Get the Thrunite Catapult Mini on Amazon (Save 20% by clicking the coupon on the page)

Gray https://amzn.to/3ma0JAD

Black https://amzn.to/3yEHWAA

ThruNite Store: https://amzn.to/37zrsOj

Lumintop Gift G1 Review (A flashlight made from TurboGlow?)

What would happen if you took an AA Lumintop Tool and made the body out of TurboGlow instead of metal? Well that’s what we basically have here with the Lumintop Gift-G1 a flashlight where most of the light is made out of TurboGlow and copper. It’s available in a number of colors and has both Cree and Nichia emitter options too. Thanks to Lumintop for sending this to me to review. It’s a fun light so let’s take a closer look.

 

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Get 20% off the Gift G2 by using the coupon code 20G1GiftOFF at https://www.lumintoponline.com/lumintop-gift-g1-turbo-glow-600-lumens-edc-tactical-flashlight-p3430046.html

 

Packaging & Accessories

The Gift-G1 comes in a small cardboard box with minimal information on it, on the back you have the emitter chosen and the body color of the light. Inside accessories include the light itself, yellow lanyard, 2 spare orings. A glow ring and 14500 battery are both optional. No pocket clip is included with the light, more on that in a minute. 

Construction

The Gift-G1 is made from TuboGlow with an internal aluminum sleeve for electrical conductivity, and at the head, the pill is made from raw copper. TurboGlow if you don’t know is the premium solid glow in the dark material. It has a much longer glow life then normal glow in the dark material. While there are several color choices available, especially with the Gift-G1 such as Lava, Red, Rainbow, Pink, Purple, Blue, and Green, I went with green because it’s the brightest color that lasts the longest. 

 

The tail cap has a semi translucent black button inside and it has RGB LED’s underneath. These LED’s come on when you have a liion battery (14500) in the light, so you get a neat effect on the sides of the LED’s slowly fading between Red, Blue, and Green. 

Internally the parts are the same as the AA Tool, and interchangeable if you have both lights. There is an aluminum tube under the TurboGlow for conductivity. At the head of the light there is a exposed raw copper pill with light engraving of the Lumintop name, and model number. It’s a nice functional heat emitter too.

 

Lastly at the front the front bezel is TurboGlow and easily unscrews to expose the TIR style optic. This exposes the MCPCB. This makes the light very easily modded if you wanted to do an emitter swap. 

Size & Weight

I measured the length at 88mm, minimum width on the body at 19.21mm, diameter at the head at 21mm. Diameter of the glow ring is 30mm. Weight with the light, 800mAh Keeppower 14500, and Reylight Lan/Pineapple clip is 70g. The light is IP68 rated. 

 

Retention

The Gift-G1 comes with a yellow lanyard as the only factory supplied retention option, that can be attached via an optional anti roll ring/cigar grip ring. This works if that’s how you want to carry the light like this, but for me if I am going to EDC a light I need a pocket clip, so I went through my lights to see what I had that might work, and I found that the clip from my Reylight Lan/Pineapples V3+ work decently well here, You basically get the entire cap section sticking up out of your pocket (20.5mm) which is a bit much for me, especially when running a 14500 and having the tail cap light up but it’s still better than no pocket clip. 

I should note, with a clip like I had, I had more then one person stop me and said the light in my pocket was on when in fact it was just the tail cap LED’s or TurboGlow glowing. So it did draw some attention to itself.

 

LED & Beam Shots

The Gift G1 here is available with a Cree XP-G3 LED in cool white, or a Nichia 219C LED in Neutral white which is what I choose. It can be powered off of a AA or 14500 battery. I will include a chat here showing the claimed outputs for each emitter and battery combination. 

I found the beam pattern to be nice for EDC, It’s got a medium large hot center with a large dim spill, good for general shorter range and medium range tasks good for maybe 200ft max. One quick note about TurboGlow is it really lasts a lot longer than your traditional GITD material. With this light when you use it, you get light leakage around the front of the light so it continuously charges it. It makes for a lot of fun, kids love it. I found no visible PWM here to the eye or camera. 

 

Heat & Runtime

As mentioned before the light will run from 2 different power sources, either a AA 1.5v battery or a 14500 3.7V battery. You get the best performance and tail cap LED’s only if you run with the Liion 14500 but I did test both battery types.

 

With the 14500 the light stepped down from 100% relative output after 2 minutes and then ran at 55% relative output and declined in a slow manner. To me the curve looks unregulated. Total runtime was 1:10:00 but after this the light staid on in it’s firefly mode for about 2.5 additional hours. Maximum heat I saw was 48C at the 20 minute mark. The exposed copper does a nice job here with heat dissipation and adds some style points too. The light does have LVP. 

I did my AA test with a Amazon Basics High Capacity NiMH battery. These have proven to be good performance in the past, and here we saw a very flat output curve maintaining 98% relative output for 2:12 minutes. Heat here was minimal and I saw the peak being 36C at the end of the runtime. 

 

UI

The UI here is simple, it’s a 4 mode light, starting at the lowest mode. Once on, you can half press the mechanical button to go up in modes. There is a strobe mode, to access that, once the light is on, click give it a half press  6 times to get to strobe. 

 

There is memory when the light is off for 3 seconds this will memorize the setting and the light will come back on to that desired setting. That said my light has a firmware bug, and this only works with a 1.5v battery, if I use the 14500 Liion, memory mode doens’t work. Lumintop confirmed that they are aware and plan to fix it on the next batch of lights.

 

Pro’s

  • Fun
  • Choice of Body colors and Emitter options
  • Good beam profile for EDC

 

Con’s

  • No clip is included, but there are options on the market that fit.
  • The glow ring isn’t included and without it or a clip it leaves a gap on the body of the light.
  • Memory mode firmware bug.

 

Conclusion

The fun with the Gift-G1 is the TurboGlow body, it’s availability in several colors, and the LED’s in the tail cap that change color when using a 14500 battery. Inside it’s basically a Lumintop Tool which is a good EDC style light. For me the let down was no pocket clip, a must on a light this size if I am going to EDC it but luckily the clip from my Reylight Pineapple fit to make it more usable on a daily basis for me. 

I think this would make a great gift, a nice addition to a flasaholics collection since there are very few lights made from so much TurboGlow or a gift for a child (kind of expensive) to get a kid into the hobby if you like. 

ThruNite TN42 V2 Review (SBT 90.2, 4848 Lumens, 4X 21700, USB-C)

Today I have a review of something special from Thrunite, a flashlight that has a giggle factor for really anyone. It’s the Thrunite TN42 V2. It’s a mighty search light featuring 4x 21700 batteries, USB-C charging, and an impressive 4848 lumens from an Luminus SBT90.2 LED. Thanks to Thrunite for sending this out to me to review this beast of a light. 

 

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Packaging & Accessories

The large TN42 comes packaged in a large Thrunite style brown cardboard box with very minimal information on the exterior. ON the inside the light is nicely secured inside a bag and surrounded with foam. Accessories include a bag of spares with extra orings, port covers and a spare button. You get a shoulder strap that attaches right in front of the button and on the rear tail cap with clips, 4x high performance 4000mAh 21700 batteries, and an AC USB-C charger. The charger has an attractive texture on it, with foldable US plugs, but feels quite light. It says it’s capable of 5V DC 5A.

 

Construction

The light is made from Aluminum and is hard anodized in a smooth semi gloss black. Fit and finish here is as good as I have seen from Thrunite. The tail cap has 3 winglets with 2 openings in each, just large enough to fit paracord in it which I plan to make into a wrist strap since one didn’t come with the light. While it looks like a 2 piece design it doesn’t unscrew so I suspect it’s glued.

The body tube has blocks milled into it for style and grip. Not a lot of either in my opinion but it does the job decently well. There is a large oring at the base of the threads that create a very tight fit. Threads are square cut and nicely greased. Mine had 2 slightly damaged areas but I don’t think this is what makes it somewhat difficult to unscrew. The battery carrier has large diameter single springs at the base and an inner aluminum brace to keep the cells from moving around.

Inside the head is a simple brass contact ring, the light has batteries in parallel so it will run with just 1 battery or all 4. On the exterior of the head you have milling for heat dissipation, on the front you have the larger electronic button with the LED power indicator in the middle. The button has very little play and a good feel for an eswitch. On the back you have the silicon port cover for the USB-C charging port. It’s nicely recessed and stays out of the way. 

The light then grows substantially in diameter to fit the large smooth and deep reflector. The LED is centered well but has plenty of room around it before the reflector starts. The lens is antireflective coated glass and is slightly protected by a bezel with light crenulations allowing light to spill out. Markings are quite minimal on the light which I like, Just the model name on the front bezel and then the ROHS, FC, CE and SN on the back. On mine Kerning on the serial number could be improved.

 

Size and Weight

This is a big boy light, while not the longest I own, it’s does have the largest reflector and front diameter. Length I measured 191mm, Diameter of the body at 60mm, maximum diameter of the head is 104mm, or 4.1”. So it makes a baseball or a 50 BMG look pretty small when placed on the front reflector. Weight with the batteries installed came in at 959g, or 33.84oz or 2.1 lbs. Weight without batteries was 648g. The light is IPX8 water rated, and it’s too big to really test in my sink. 

Some comparison with some other Lights.

 

Thrunite TN42 V2 on the Left, Astrolux FT03S on the Right.

 

Retention

Your retention options here are limited from the factory. The light comes with a shoulder strap that clips into the front of the light above the button and rear tail cap. The front mount is kind of unique in how it mounts, it’s also close to the button but doesn’t interfere. While I am not typically a wrist strap person I think one here would be nice just do to the sheer size of the light and to add a bit more security when holding it. So I will build one with paracord. Let me know if you know of any good tutorials for this. 

 

LED & Beam Shots

The TN42 V2 is using the Luminus SBT 90.2 LED in 5700k with a CRI of 70. This LED is 3V on a single die with a large physical size. It combines high output with high lumens which makes for very high output and far throwing flashlights and in the TN42 V2 that’s exactly what you get. The beam profile that results on the TN42 V2 is a quite small hotspot, a small corona, and a large area of a dim spill. At a couple hundred feet you get a little bit of a donut shape in the very center but this isn’t super noticeable. 

 

Official output specs

 

There was no noticeable PWM with this light.

 

Heat & Runtime

Thrunite lists Turbo 4848 lumens, as lasting for 125 second before stepping down and in my tests it lasted 120 seconds before really starting the ramp down, so pretty close. At 145 seconds it was down to it’s steady 40% of relative output, an estimated 1737 lumens. It maintains this for 2:30:00 before declining down to firefly mode over the next 30 minutes. It will run in firefly for about 2:20:00 until low voltage protection kicks in at 2.89V. Total runtime from turbo to LVP was 5:16:00. FL1 was more like 2:42:00. Maximum heat I saw was at 2 places, First at 51C at 2:20 and then again at the end of output at 2:30:00.

I will throw up another graph here of the relative outputs comparing all 4 batteries to 1 battery so you can see the runtime differences. Realize that the outputs here are not identical but similar. 

 

UI

The UI here is simple and the same as many other Thrunite lights. From Off Long press to go to firefly mode. Once on just short press to turn off. Once on, a long press on the button will cycle the light through the 3 main modes and a short press will turn it off. Double click to go to turbo, and triple click to go to fast strobe. The light does have memory for the main 3 modes. 

 

Recharging & Power

The TN42 V2 uses 4x 4000mAh 21700 sized batteries in a parallel connection. While the batteries that are provided are of the proprietary nature, with positive and negative on the same end of the battery they are not required here. Any button top 21700 thats the correct length will work on this light. Because the light is using batteries in a parallel connection the batteries should be married to the light for safety. 

The included charger is light weight but seems to work just fine over the USB-C connection. I tested with it and a 45w USB-C charger from Aukey and got the same charging time for both. Charging from LVP at 2.89V to full at 4.18V with all for took 8 hours in my testing. Max charging rate I saw was 1.85A, and it will charge via USB-C to C or USB-C PD. While charging the light will work in Firefly and low modes. 

The LED in the center of the button is a power level indicator both when using the light and while charging. Double check the manual for the color codes that are being used here. 

 

Pro’s

  • Giggle Factor
  • Standard button top 21700 batteries work here.
  • Massive amount of Light at a long distance, very useable beam with the spill too

 

Con’s

  • Very large light
  • Expensive
  • I would have liked to see a small bag included to protect the light when not in use and for storage.

 

Conclusion

The Thrunite TN42 V2 has the giggle factor, both in terms of performance and size. It really creates a massive amount of light, with both the spill and long distance. No other LED light I have comes close. The 2 LEP lights I have have a more focused beam but no where near the number of lumens. I have other high lumen lights that create a ton of flood but no where near the distance. My Astrolux FT03S which has the same LED as the TN42 V2 has doesn’t throw as far or is quite as focused. 

While the TN42 V2 is big it’s really the best optimized SBT 90.2 light I have seen and it gets solid life out of the 4x 21700 batteries. It’s impressive both to flashaholics and civilians. While scouting out locations to film my night shots I had people come from the other side of the lake to check this thing out because they couldn’t believe it. 

The TN42 V2 isn’t going to be for everyone due to it’s size and price but if your budget allows, you won’t regret the purchase here. The light definitely would be useful as a search light if you have a lot of land, need to spot animal threats, or for search and rescue tasks. I can definitely recommend it! 

 

Thrunite is running a Coupon till at least 5/18/2021 to save about $80 off the cost of this light. No coupon code needed so if your thinning about this one it’s best to order now to get the best deal.

RovyVon Aurora A33 Review (180 Lumens, Nichia 219C, 90CRI, USB-C)

Today I have a new penlight from Royvon, It’s available in a variety of exterior colors, and comes with an optional high CRI LED as well, and even has USB-C to charge it’s internal lithium ion battery. Thanks to Royvon for sending this to me to review. Link to where you can find it as well as my social media channels are down below in the description.

 

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Packaging & Accessories

Packaging is a simple black box with a line drawing of the light on the outside. The box has a black and orange theme, it is printed to reflect the LED that’s in this light with a sticker on the back telling you which version and body color you have here. 

Accessories are limited and include the light, pocket clip thats preinstalled but removable, and a 6” USB-A to USB-C cable along with a manual and warranty card.

 

Construction

The Aurora A33 is made of aluminum and in my example is anodized in green. Several other body colors are available including Black, Gunmetal, Red, and Desert Tan. Starting at the rear it has a flat metal button with a nice machined circular pattern in it for a bit of texture for the eswitch. There is a ring around the button that makes it sit slightly recessed, this also helps protect the button too. It feels a little odd but does help you locate it and helps keep from turning on in the pocket. The button is does have a bit of a vague feeling to it that I am not a huge fan of but does has a nice click. 

 

To access the charging port the  rear tail section unscrews slightly. This is easier shown then described but it’s best to grab the tail section itself not the clip since the clip rotates more easily. Once unscrewed the USB-C port is exposed as well as a LED indicator when recharging. There is an oring to keep everything sealed

 

The body tube has some spirals milled into it for texture and style. These are better then normal knurling visually but could be a little more aggressive in my taste. The body tube and head are one piece with the front bezel being glued in place it looks like. The front features a glass lens and TIR style optic. Internally there is a 600mAh LiPo battery sealed inside the light. This is non user replaceable battery. 

 

Retention

The primary method of retention is the included deep carry pocket clip on the A33. It’s a clip on style clip and can be removed if you want. The unfortunate thing is here that it does spin around the light with a little bit for effort, I wish it was a bit tighter fit. It’s a fairly wide and substantial clip, and the steel is springy. It’s reasonably secure in the pocket but I wish it was a little stiffer so it was more secure. There is a small step in the clip that your pocket can snag on. That said I am a fan here, the clip overall is better then 85% of flashlights I review. 

 

Size and Weight 

I measured the length of the Aurora A33 at 119mm, maximum diameter tail at 16.5mm, minimum diameter at the body at 14.6mm. Weight with the clip installed is 42.2g. The light is IPX8 rated which I did test overnight in a glass of water.

 

LED & Beam Shots

The Aurora A33 is available with 2 LED’s I have the Nichia 219C at 5000k and 90 CRI, but a Cree XP-G2 with cool white, and about 20 more lumens (200 lumens total) on it’s highest output if you prefer. The light is using a TIR reflector and produces a medium sized hot center and a medium amount of spill. It’s good for this style of light where your mostly going to be using at short and medium distances.

 

Aurora A33 on Left, Nitecore MT06MD

 

There is some PWM that my scope noticed here, it’s fast and not noticeable to my eye or camera. But the scope does catch it. 

Output modes on the Nichia model are officially rated at 0.5 Lumens, 15 lumens, 60 lumens, and 180 lumens

 

Heat and Runtime

The light has 4 modes, and I did runtime graphs for the two highest modes. On high, the light lasts for a total of 88 minus, the first 12 minutes are above 90% relative output and you see a slight step down in output. At the 45 minute mark your still producing 80% of relative output. After this though you see a sharp decline for the remaining amount of time. Highest temp I observed was around 36C at the 40 minute mark.

 

In medium the light lasts an impressive 5:48:00. It an long S curve making me think there might not be much regulation on this mode. That said it was running at 60% relative output out to the 2:50:0) mark. 

 

UI

UI here is mostly simple as long as you remember you have to long press to turn on the light. Once on single presses will allow you to go up in the 4 modes. Long press to turn off. There is no memory modes and you always start at the bottom of the mode range. Which changing modes I did notice that I had to give it some time to go up the range, I couldn’t click fast or double press to go up the range faster. That’s a little annoying, I would love a double or triple click to turbo here. 

 

This is a revised UI than this light originally shipped with, and Royvon has yet to update their website to reflect this but I confirmed this with the company. 

 

When the power does get low you do get a red LED indicator that comes on, however this LED is normally covered with the top of the cap that covers the USB-C port. 

 

Recharging

Recharging is accomplished via USB-C onboard the light. It will charge via USB-C to C. To get to the charging port the tail cap must be unscrewed a bit. This is a little hard to do due the oring seal and the facto the pocket clip rotates fairly easily. Once open this will expose the port and charge status LED. When low on power (10% remaining) this light will remain red. When charging it a slow fading blue LED and when charged it’s solid blue. Total charge time on the internal 600mAh LiPo battery was 1:02:00. Max charge rate was .52A.

The light will work through all modes while charging but the button to turn the light on is hard to press, especially if you have larger fingers. 

 

Pro’s

  • Neutral white, high CRI emitter option is available. Nice choice with the Nicahia 219C LED.
  • Good deep carry pocket clip, I wish it didn’t rotate as easily and was a bit stiffer.
  • Affordable and available in a good variety of colors.

 

Con’s

  • Built in battery is non user replaceable. 
  • Takes slightly longer to turn on with the long press to on then I would like but it won’t come on accidentally this way.
  • The instructions talk about 2 modes on the later models like I have this has been eliminated for simplicity.

 

Conclusion

I like the Royvon Aurora A33 as a pen format sized light. It’s got the enthusiast in mind with a number of body colors and a neutral high CRI LED option. The Nichia 219C in 5000k is a great choice here for a number of tasks.

I like that it has onboard USB-C charging as well, it makes it convenient to charge and fairly quick. The UI here is good, not great, and I would say the same with the pocket clip, I would just like it to be a tad more secure.

Overall as long as you don’t mind the sealed battery I think this the best pen light I have reviewed in a few years. It’s affordable, has a choice of LED, and body color, good clip and just an overall well rounded package that I can recommend. 

Cyansky M3 Review (700 Lumens, Titanium, 16340, EDC)

Today I have Cyanskys Titanium M3 light. This is a new manufacture to the flashlight world and new to me. Thanks to them for sending this to me and being patient with how long it took me to review it. 

 

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Packaging & Accessories

Packaging here is a very small retail hanging box. It’s made of plastic and has a few stats on the outside and a clear window to see the light inside. Accessories include a 700mAh 16340 battery with microUSB charging on the cell, a microUSB charging cable, extra oring, and clip. Outside the box came a fairly traditional lanyard with some leather straps at the joints.

 

Construction

The light is made from titanium, the exact alloy is unknown, but it looks and feels of it. The finish is a fine bead blast and almost semi gloss as a result. The tail is flat, non magnetic and there are additional “required” laser engravings here. You have a spot for a small diameter through the lanyard here, which might be a good idea due to the size of the light. 

 

The clip on the light is designed to fit at the rear, for a head down carry. It’s the clip on type and is a pretty tight fit. The body section has different linear millings on it to add some texture and style. Thread on the body are square cut and have the slight grittyness/galling of titanium. The tight threads, and strong spring at the rear mean with the battery in it’s a little hard to get the threads started sometimes. 

 

The head looks like you could reverse the clip here but in practice it doesn’t work very well, due to the wrong angle of the clip. The head grows in size slightly with some very shallow fins and anti roll “rings”. The button here is nearly flush fitting and also titanium. It’s hard to find and makes no noise when pressed which makes it even harder to locate. The front bezel is thin in depth but thick in diameter. It spins freely but doesn’t seem to unscrew. 

 

Size & Weight

I measured the length at 50.85g, max diameter at 22mm, minimum diameter at 20.5mm. I measured the weight with the battery and clip installed at 49.1g. The light is rated for IP68 so not completely waterproof but good for 30 min of water at 1.5m. 

 

Retention

The light has 2 retention options, first is the push on clip, it’s designed to fit at the rear of the light. While it can rotate it’s a tight fit and will scratch the light. The clip allows for a very deep carry but amount of space at the top of the loop is too small for any material that I tried. 

 

The other option is to use the included lanyard at the rear of the light. This lanyard is a little more fancy than normal with a bit of leather on it and it didn’t fit in the box. 

 

LED & Beam

The M3 uses Cree XP-G3 LED with the S4 bin. It’s very cool white, and fairly harsh to my eyes. I would guess it’s about 6500-7000k. The orange peel reflector under the anti reflective coated lens, is actually pretty small, at about 9mm in diameter, and it’s decently deep. That said the beam is mostly flood, it has a semi large hot spot but it’s not very defined. Personally I prefer a TIR style optic in a light like this. 

 

As far as output Chansky claims 700 lumens, but comparing it to other lights I have I have my doubts about this. That’s confirmed by a few others reviewers. Mode spacing is decent but it lacks a firefly mode. Modes spacing is 5, 30, 150, 700.

 

I noticed no PWM to my eye or camera. On my oscilloscope there was a bit of sawtooths to the lower modes. Nothing to worry about. 

 

Heat & Runtime

I did all my runtime tests with the included 700mAh 16340 battery. When I tested the battery itself in my Vapcell S4 Plus charger that I reviewed last year it came in right at 704mAh which is great. The light will also run off a CR123A if you want, but expect less runtime. 

 

Overall effective runtime on this light in my tests was 1:05:00. LVP kicked in at the 2:15:00 mark at 3.13V. Turbo on this light steps down very quickly, at the 30 second mark, It’s able to maintain this after step down for most of it’s runtime thought. Max temp I saw was 54C at the 1hr mark. 

 

UI

The UI on this light is simple but a little different from many others. From off, to on you have to press and hold the button, and the light comes on in low. If you keep holding the light will go to strobe. Once on you have 4 modes, and at any time you can do a single press to go up modes. Long press will turn the light off. There is no memory modes or shortcuts. The biggest issue I have with the UI is finding the button, it is almost flush, and the same color when looking at it so it’s hard to feel and hard to see. 

 

Recharging

Recharging is accomplished on the included 700mAh battery via a built in MicroUSB port on the battery. The charging time here is pretty long at 2:09:00, and on the slow side at 0.34A. This is certainly on the safe and conservative side for a battery this size. The battery itself has LED’s on top like many cells with onboard charging, red when charging, green when charged. 

 

Pro’s

  • Titanium body with a nice fit and finish
  • Very small, and short size
  • Standard Battery

 

Con’s

  • Very cool white, floody beam
  • Button is hard to find, has no tactical feel, impossible to use with gloves.
  • Expensive list price

 

Conclusion

The Cyansky M3 is a good first attempt by the new company of an EDC style flashlight. While it’s expensive because of its titanium construction that also what caught my eye and why I wanted to take a look. The front lens assembly is a little different construction from what’s more commonly seen, and the result is a very floody beam. I personally prefer a TIR optic in this type small EDC light.

In a future light I do hope they improve the button locatability with maybe a button with some texture on it, add some additional space on the clip so that it fits better over more materials, and offer an LED that more neutral, maybe even high CRI even if it sacrifices overall output. 

 

Because of the well thought out UI, activation in the pocket isn’t an issue, it just takes a second to remember you have to press and hold to turn on, making it different from most other flashlight UI’s. 

 

Let me know in the comments below on your thoughts on ths Cyansky M3.