Thrunite 2C V3 Review (1100 Lumens, Ramping UI, Short + Long tube)

I have enjoyed the previous lights from Thrunite that I have taken a look at and they asked if I would be interested in looking at a current model of the Thrunite 2C V3. The Thrunite 2C V3 is an all in one light with onboard charging and it’s flexible in its physical size and with the batteries it can use. Thanks to Thrunite for sending it for me to take a look at.

Full Image Gallery for this Review: https://imgur.com/a/zwNCRhe

YouTube Version of this Review:

What’s in the package
The box is similar to other Thrunite’s I have reviewed recently. It’s a sturdy brown paper box with limited markings and information. The goodies are all in side. Included is the Flashlight itself, pocket clip, lanyard, MicroUSB charging cable, bag of spares (Oring, 2 USB port covers, and button diagram), and Thrunite button top protected, high discharge 3400mah 18650 battery. The holster is made for this light and it fits nicely. There is a plastic d-ring at the top and the belt loop is fixed.






Construction
This light is made from aluminium and is hard anodized with a smooth gloss finish. Some interesting design choices have been made to keep this light short and flexible with it’s battery sizes. Starting at the back the rear is flat and non magnetic. There is a small hole drilled for the lanyard and below that is the only place a clip attaches to the light. The clip itself is very deep carry and works well for both length of the light. The body tube is 2 pieces with square cut threading and an O ring. This design allows battery size flexibility which I will talk about more in a few minutes. The knurling is a diamond pattern and is deep and aggressive.



The head portion of the Neutron 2C has the anti roll ring which contains the electronic button with LED charge status indicator in the center. The button sits pretty flat and has a nice audible click. The microUSB charging port is opposite. It’s standard depth so any standard cable should work well. The charging cover is a smart design. It uses a larger looped piece of rubber that goes around the entire head of the light and this is what the door sealing out moisture is located. The result is it’s super easy to replace if needed.



Size & Water Rating
Length in long configuration 125mm
Length in short configuration 94mm
Width at it’s maximum 26mm
Width at it’s minimum 24.5mm
The light is IPX8 water rated.
 Short
 Long

LED/Runtime/Parasitic Drain
The LED used here is a Cree XP-L V6 in Cool White, Neutral White is available as well and is my personal preference.The reflecto is smooth and fairly deep. LED centering is nice, and everything sits behind a antireflective coated glass lens.

This light can use a variety of different sizes of lithium batteries. It ships with a Thrunite button top, protected, high drain 3400mAh battery which is how I will most likely use it the most. It will also work with 2X CR123A, 1X 18350, 1× 16340, or 2× 16340. Button tops are recommended. I had some minor issues getting my flat top 18350’s working with small magnets. Working voltage is 2.7-9.0V.

 Short
 Long

Beam Pattern
The Neutron 2C throws quite well for an EDC. It has a small hot center with a moderate spill and hard cut off. It’s a pretty useful beam pattern.

Runtime
I ran my runtime test with the included 3400mAh 18650 battery. In Turbo mode the light will last about 10 minutes before you see a large decline to about 65% relative output. This will go for about 60 seconds before a slow gentle decrease down to 10% relative output when the Low Voltage Protection cut in. Low Voltage cut off with the included battery was 2.93V. I measured parasitic drain at 0.3uA.

UI
UI on this light ramps. That means there isn’t defined modes for the most part. Using a long press from off and the light enters firefly mode at 0.5 lumens. Long press again and you get to what Thrunite is calling Infinity Low at 12 lumens. Here is where the ramping begins. Long pressing again and the light begins increasing in brightness slowly. It takes 6 seconds to reach Infinity high at 650 lumens. Double click at any time to reach Turbo at 1100 lumens, and double click again to reach strobe. When in the ramping modes you can stop at any time at the desired brightness. If you long press again it will begin decreasing. The light will flash at both high and low ends to let you know you have reached the maximum or minimum.

Recharging
Recharging is accomplished via the microUSB port opposite the switch on the light. Unfortunately the light only recharges at a maximum speed of 1A. This means it’s a bit slow to recharge. In my test it took 4 hours and 52 minutes to recharge from 2.93V to 4.2V. The LED button contained within the button of the light acts as both a battery level indicator while the light is in use and a charging indicator while charging based on the color and blink pattern.

Pro

  • Available in Neutral and Cool White emitters
  • Flexible in output to whatever level desired, but the ramping is a little slow.
  • Flexible in length and battery
  • 3400mAh high drain 18650 battery is included.
  • Con
  • 1A recharging is a little slow. It would be nice to see this move up to 2A.
  • The ramping output of the light doesn’t cover the entire range. Nothing between 650 lumens and 1100 lumens. Ramping is only available between 12 lumens and 650 lumens.

Conclusion

The Thrunite Neutron 2C V3 packs a lot of features and flexibility into one small package with a nice UI. I would like to see ramping be a bit faster and cover the entire range of the lights output ability. That said it’s an all around nice light that really give the user a lot of flexibility in what battery they they want to run (Or what’s available), flexibility to in the length of the light without any extra parts to buy, option of the emitter tint, and flexibility to charge onboard via microUSB. Overall I think this is a light that will appeal to both enthusiasts and non flashaholics. Pickup the ThruNite Neutron 2C V3 on Amazon at (Affiliate Link) or from Thrunite Direct http://www.thrunite.com/thrunite-neutron-2c-v3-1100-lumen-flashlight/

Olight i3T Review (180 lumen AAA Powered Flashlight)

Olight has another new small flashlight to take a look at. Today I have the Olight i3T EOS. It’s a small AAA powered, tail switch light with 2 modes of illumination. In my review I plan to compare it to the Streamlight MicroStream because they are similar in size and operation as well as price. Thanks to Olight for sending this out to take a look at.

Full Image Gallery: https://imgur.com/a/i6z6SFs
YouTube Version of this Review:

Packaging & Size
The packaging is similar to other recent Olight products. It’s a white small cardbord box with relevant info on the sides and back. Inside is a plastic tray that holds the light and directions. This light doesn’t come with many extras only a preinstalled generic battery. The light is IPX8 water rated, and features a 5 year warranty. With battery it only weights 41g.



 (This one bothers my OCD)

Physical comparison
The triple AAA style lights carry well when they have a good clip. Both lights here are contenders. I find diameter to be important especially for summer EDC when wearing thinner materials and less bulky clothes. The Olight i3T is a hair shorter The nthe Streamlight Microstream, mostly all down to the button. The Streamlight has a bit of a reputation for not having the best retention in the clip. The Olight doesn’t seem to have this problem so far in my 2 weeks of carry. Aside from outputs and modes the buttons are the biggest difference. The Streamlight has a more traditional rubber button and you can activate it by rollin in from the side. The Olight on the other hand has plastic sides on the button and a rubber top so it can only be activated from straight down.

Construction
The Olight i3T is made of aluminum and has a gloss black anodizing on it. Starting at the tail the button stands proud and is easy to find. It has a studded rubber pattern on the very top, but the sides are hard plastic. This creates a very sturdy feel, and you have to be directly on top to activate it. This helps prevent side activation or rolling to activate. The tail is the only part that comes apart. It has straight cut knurling on it that is fine. Inside it’s a threaded brass insert with a gold colored spring.





The body has a unique grip. It’s a spiral cut area that’s milled out in two little rows. It’s not a high grip design but it’s more then some of the competitors have and it’s something different. It won’t tear up your clothes and I like it. The head is pretty simple. It’s glued in place and has branding and model name and serial number on it. The lens is glass and under is a TIR style reflector and a small LED.

The clip is a new design that is reversible and removable. In head down configuration it carries faily deep. It has ample area at either end for both thin and chick pants. Retention was good I had no issues on thin slick short pockets or thicker jean type pockets. The clip can also be used to attach the light the bill of a hat.

LED/Runtime/UI
The i3T usesa Philips Luxeon TX LED in cool white with a TIR reflector. This was the same LED used in the recent Olight i1R keychain light. It’s LED tint is not super cool, more of a warmer cool tint. Currently there are no plans to offer this in a warm or neutral tint.

The beam of the i3T has a small hot center with a smooth fall off to spill. The Streamlight’s beam pattern is similar but the cut off is harder. At distance this harder cut off is more apparent and the Olights looks more even. In my comparison shot here the Streamlight is on the left and the Olight is on the right. It’s hard to make a fair comparison shot because of the lumen differences. The Olight is on Low, and the Streamlight is on in it’s one mode.
 (Olight i3T on a cream colored wall on Low mode)
 (Streamlight Microstream on the left in it’s 1 mode, Olight i3T (CW) on low mode on the right. Different lumen outputs here.)

This light is not compatible with lithium 10440 batteries officially according to the manual. However it does work with them if they are flat tops. Mine happen to be button tops. It is compatible with Alkaline, and rechargeable NiHM batteries officially which is what I have been using and recommend since there is no low voltage protection. I suspect the internals are very similar to the recent Olight i1R keychain light as it’s the same LED and reflector combo.

For my runtime tests I used an Amazon Basics AAA rechargeable battery. I got a solid 10 minutes at the brightest setting (180 lumens) which was about 10 minutes before the light decreased in output to about 40% relative output over the next 10 minutes. At this point it ran for 40 minutes before continuing to drop off. Total runtime starting out in high was 70 minutes. The Olight i3T has a low mode as well at 5 lumens and they claim it will last for 16 hours. While the streamlight microstream has a longer output at 175 minutes it’s producing quite a bit less light during this time then compared to the olights High mode.

UI
The UI of the i3T is fairly simple. It starts off in low, and if you click (or momentary) again you get high output mode. If you change modes again within 2 seconds it will remember where you are, if longer then that the light will start again in low. The tail switch is capable of momentary with just a half press or constant on with a full press (audible click).

Pro’s

  • Small Size and TIR reflector
  • Well done dual direction pocket clip
  • Well built
  • 2 Mode UI but 3 modes would be nicer.

Con’s

  • Cool white only emitter
  • Could be a little more throwy
  • No official 10440 compatibility due to lack of LVP.
  • No signature Olight blue Bezel.

Conclusion
The Olight i3T is a nice update to the 1 AAA options Olight has. I welcome the two mode button top design. The pocket clip has good retention and is deep enough. The top click mount button prevents side presses which helps prevent accidental activation in the pocket. The new milling on the body could be a bit more grippy in my opinion but I like the new look. I wish a neutral or warm tint LED was offered but I understand that adds cost and manufacture complications to service a smaller segment of the market. Overall I think the i3T is a nice light from Olight that should be popular to many and a good option for those looking for more output from a Streamlight Microstream or other similar lights. It can be purchased in the USA at OlightStore.com or at Amazon.

Litesam ED08 Review (14500, EDC)

Litesam is a newer brand operated by the same people who run FiTorch. It’s a single emitter AA/14500 sized light designed with everyday carry in mind. Thanks to Litesam for sending it to me. Due to some recent wrist surgery I am going to try and keep this shorter since typing and editing with a splint/cast isn’t the most fun thing to do right now. So if you see fewer reviews and videos from me over the next 8 weeks this is why.

Packaging and Accessories

Packaging is a small cardboard box with a slip on cover where all the details are located. It was a very tight fit and a little difficult to open without ripping it open. Inside the light was contained in a clear plastic tray with the light, holster, lanyard, and extra oring, and extra tail button. The battery was preinstalled but needed to have a plastic disk removed before it was operational.

The light is made from black anodized aluminum. Its fairly light weight in at 55g with the included battery and clip. Length comes in at 101mm and diameter at 18.25mm and compared to a few other 14500 lights I have the ED08 is slightly longer then my Reylight Ti-Lan V3, and quite a bit longer then my Olight S1A. However of the 3, the ED08’s diameter is the smallest. The knurling is a diamond shaped with the flats having additional texture and a few milled areas. Shape wise it’s fairly generic and is just about as thin as possible for as possible. Threads were standard but dry.

The tail has 2 large lanyard holes that also serve the purpose of protecting the button. The light will tail stand but its not the most stable doing so.The button is a loud clicky mechanical style that takes a decent effort to push. I didn’t have any trouble with it coming on accidently in my pocket. The lens is smooth and LED is well centered.

LED, UI, Runtimes

This light uses a Cree XP-L in Cool white. It’s one of the most cold tint’s I have seen in a light this year or longer. The beam pattern is good for EDC tasks, it’s got a hot center and projects decently well. It’s flood is functional.

Included battery is a Litesam branded, button top, protected 14500 rated at 750mAh. It’s overall length is 52.13mm. I had no issues with it

Runtime on 14500

On the supplied 14500 total runtime from 100% output to 0 relative output was about 110 minutes. Most of the time was below 50% relative output. high lasted about 2-3 minutes before the big step down occurred. Medium is where this light stayed for most of its curve.

Advertised brightness’s are high at 700 lumens, 100 lumens on medium, 30 lumens on low. 700 lumens for both Strobe and SOS.

Runtime on Eneloop resulted in less overall output but more of that higher output for longer. It was able to keep over 90% relative output for about 50 minutes before a large decrease over the next 20 minutes. Overall runtime was 105 minutes.

Parasitic Drain was measured at 0.23mA.

 

UI

The UI of this light is one area that could be improved a lot in my opinion. It goes from High, Medium, Low, Strobe and then SOS. For EDC I prefer a light to start in its lowest mode giving the user the option to bump up if needed and retain night vision. I also really don’t like having to cycle through Strobe and SOS as part of the main mode group. These would be much better under a sub mode, requiring a double or triple click to get there.

 

Pocket Clip

In the pocket this is decent. The clip is built for thin pockets, jeans or any canvas type material will have a hard time fitting to the top of the clip and thus not as deep as possible. Personally I prefer as deep as carry as possible and this one could be deeper. Other then that I had no issues during carry or retention.

Pro’s

  • I like that it includes a decent 14500 cell in the package with the light for the low price.

  • Thin profile with good knurling

  • Good Beam profile for an EDC light

Con’s

  • Has Strobe and Beacon in main modes, these would be better as a shortcut or a secondary mode on an EDC light.

  • Very cool tint

  • Pocket clip could be deeper and designed to fit thicker pants.

Conclusion

At time of writing this light can be found in the US for less then $25 on Amazon (Affiliate Link). Given that it comes with a 14500 battery I find this is a pretty good value for this size of light if you don’t mind cool white. I don’t have the equipment to get an accurate lumen reading but when comparing it to other AA lights I feel like the rating of 700lm may be a little optimistic. I personally don’t care for the light having Strobe and SOS in it’s main mode group and the fact that it starts in high, with memory on all modes. Hopefully Lightsam offers a revised UI in the future that takes the special modes out of the main group as it would make the light a more attractive EDC option.

Olight i1R Keychain Flashlight Review & Giveaway

I have reviewed several keychain style flashlights and due to size, I end up taking many of them off. This is where the Olight i1R is different. It’s seriously tiny yet is a completely functional bright light for brief uses offering 5 and 130 lumen modes. Thanks to Olight for providing this to me to take a look at. I am also doing a giveaway over on my Youtube channel an Olight i1R to a lucky viewer in North America.

Full Image Gallery: https://imgur.com/a/QvnqSTC
YouTube Version of this Review + Giveaway:

Packaging
With such a small light it also has a small packaging. The i1R packaging follows the recent several Olights of being a white heavy cardboard box with a plastic tray inside. It contains the light itself with its built in battery and split ring already attached, a olight branded micro USB cable and the manual.



Construction
This light is built from nicely machined black anodized aluminum. The light has a little bit of straight knurling on the head that provides good grip to twist the light on and off. Twist off the head completely and you get the microUSB connector for recharging. The light weights 0.42 ounces and is only 41mm in length. It’s also IPX-8 rated and I can attest it will survive a few drops from waist height onto ceramic flooring.




Compare to a few other small lights and objects.

https://i.imgur.com/naJ06cR.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/IS4qEgw.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/kHePoYY.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/5TAXPm5.jpg

On the back there is a simple diagram showing you which way to turn the light to make it work. From off, turn it clockwise and first you will get low, keep twisting and you get high. Turn to the light left until it turns off.

LED + Runtime + Charging
The LED in use is a Philips Luxeon TX in a pleasant cool white. The beam pattern is smooth with no artifacts or hot spot.

The battery is an internal and sealed lithium ion 10180. This is unfortunate. It’s also been mentioned that it doesn’t have low voltage protection over on Budget Light Forums. At this price point I can live with a sealed battery but I think it really needs LVP for protection. Overly discharging the cell once isn’t that dangerous but charging it again can be more dangerous. For a light that’s aimed at the mainstream consumer it’s something that it should really have.

In Low mode of 5 lumens, Olight rates it as being able to produce light for 7 hours, and on high 130 lumens, it’s rated for 20 minutes. I made one discharge graph from high and it lasts a bit longer than 20 minutes. It creates a S curve as it discharges losing lumens slowly the entire time. I stopped my test at 30 minute mark and the battery measured 2.82V.


Charging is accomplished via the built in microUSB port that can be found if you completely unscrew the head. There is a fairly bright red LED under the white plastic positive end that stays on until the light is charged when it turns green. Charging happens fairly slowly as you would expect from a small battery like this. In my test it took 65 minutes at 0.08A maximum speed.

Giveaway
Olight has provided me a brand new i1R in the box that I will be giving away to a viewer on June 12th 2018 to my North American audience. I will be using Glem.io and have a link in the description below. To enter you will need to make sure you subscribe to my YouTube channel. I will have a few other ways you can increase your chances at winning in the description over on YouTube.

<a class=“e-widget no-button” href=“https://gleam.io/i2Cnr/olight-i1r-giveaway” rel=“nofollow”>Olight i1R Giveaway</a> <script type=“text/javascript” src=“https://js.gleam.io/e.js” async=“true”></script>

Conclusion
The Olight i1R is simple but effective keychain light that is really small and lightweight. It’s not exactly what enthusiasts would want since it lacks a removable battery and Low voltage protection, however at this price point of under $20 I think this will be a hit. My girlfriend wants it to replace the Nitecore Tiny she had had on her keys because it’s smaller and won’t activate as easily. I think for what it is this is a perfectly adequate light and plan to put it on my keychain for a backup light to use for short periods of time. I do think it should have LVP added and hopefully they are able to do that. Overall I like the Olight i1R because of it’s small size, relatively high output and affordable price. Check it out at the Olight Store. or on Amazon.

Thrunite Catapult V6 Review (26650 Compact Thrower, MicroUSB Rechargeable)

Today I have a review of the Thrunite Catapult V6. This the 6th generation in Catapult “Thrower” line from Thrunite. It’s compact spotlight style light using a 26650 battery, and is capable of throwing light out to 750 meters and upto 1700 lumens. Thanks to Thrunite for sending this to me to review and evaluate.

Full Image Gallery: https://imgur.com/a/K0bz2lc
YouTube Version of this Review:

Packaging
Packaging is like similar Thrunite products I have reviewed, it comes in a sturdy brown paper box with minimal information on the outside with only the company name, address, model number and LED designation. In my case it was hand checked Cool White. Inside the light was encased in egg case foam. Accessory wise the light includes a Thrunite branded 5000mAh button top 26650 battery, 2 extra Orings, an extra USB cover, extra inner button rubber, split ring, Thrunite branded Lanyard with split ring, a Holster, and a Micro USB charging cable.




The holster is nicely designed to fit the large head of this light. It’s lightly padded and made of the nylon. There is no DRing and the belt loop is permanently attached. The holster is the way to go if you were wanting to carry this light on your person. The multilanguage manual is brief but does a good job of going over the necessary info in 4 languages (English, German, Chinese, Japanese).

Construction
Construction of the Catapult V6 is on par with other recent Thrunite lights I have looked at such as the TC20. It’s made of nicely machined aluminium and anodized in a black hard semi gloss coating. The tail caps on the Catapult V6 and TC20 look similar. Both are non magnetic and allow the light to tail stand. Each has a small hole for the included lanyard. Its one area where some will want a larger hole for paracord. There isn’t any knurling on the tail cap but I was able to get it off easily. Threads are square cut and lightly lubricated along with an Oring.


The body tube has a large diamond pattern milled around it. This isn’t super grippy but it’s a nice change from a more traditional knurling patterns. The body tube is directional but doesn’t have any polarity markings on it for the battery. This light does come into 3 pieces the tail cap, body tube, and head.

The head is fairly large. The light has a polished steel bezel that can be unscrewed with considerable effort according to others on budget light forums. The lens is large and anti reflective coated glass. The reflector is smooth and deep with the LED nicely centered on a large white PCB. The head has minimal milled out areas The button is metal feeling and has a hole for an indicator LED underneath for charging status. It’s an electric switch and requires medium effort to use.


LED + Beamshots, Runtimes
This light uses a Cree XHP35 HI LED in cool white. According to the box there may be a Neutral White Catapult V6 in the future, however as of now this has not been released. This is a 12V emitter so the light is using a boost driver to get the batteries voltage to that level. It has a working voltage of 2.75V to 4.2V

Supplied with the Thrunite 5000mAh 26650 button top battery. It’s capable of delivering the 8A this light requires when use of Turbo.The light will accept button or flat top batteries without issue.

Outputs are pretty impressive. Turbo is rated for 1700 lumens, high for 960, medium for 180 lumens, low for 22 lumens, and firefly at 0.5 lumens. The light also has strobe that is at 1200 lumens.

The Catapult V6 was able to maintain a longer runtime for quite a while, maintaining above 60% relative output for about 125 minutes. Turbo slowly fell to about 90% relative output over the first 20 minutes which is where the light stepped down and ran for another 40 before stepping down for the remaining 70 minutes. Fall off after that was pretty rapid.

Distance
The beamshot of this light is a spotlight thrower. I found it impressive that even on moonlight mode (0.5 Lumens) it ends up throwing quite well over 10ft on a dark night. Over a longer distance and with higher modes the light beam does spread some but it’s still a spotlight. The distance claim of 750 meters is reasonably accurate. The light does have minimal amount of spill with a hard cut off on the edges. Video is really the best to see this in action. See the YouTube version of this review above.

Compared to Klarus XT32 and other 26650 lights I have
When I compared it to my Klarus XT32 the tint colors are very similar. The Captapult V6 has a little bit larger hotspot and a harder cut off on the spill at distances over 100 yards. I think the Catapult V6 for me in my hand is better balanced and easier to manipulate. I also included a picture of the size of the Catapult V6 in comparisons to other 26650 lights I have.

UI
UI is clear and simple to follow. From off a short press starts the light off in low, and short presses will cycle up in modes to medium and high. When the light is on in any mode double click to shortcut to turbo, double click again takes you to strobe. To access firefly long press from off. The light also has memory and will turn on in the last mode accessed except for firefly, turbo and strobe modes.

USB Recharging
The light also is capable of being recharged via microUSB. This is opposite the electronic switch and is covered with a rubber flap. I had no issues with the flap staying in place. Charge time was a respectable 3 hours 22 minutes from empty to full charge with a maximum rate of 2.14A.

Conclusions
This is one of the more compact throwers on the market for the sub $100 price. It’s a complete package including the battery, light, and recharging cable along with holster and spares. Some of the competitors such as the Emmisar D1S are sold as just the light. Combine the Thrunites fash shipping from the US and complete package I feel like it makes a pretty good value. I like the compact size for a thrower and use of one 26650 battery. I have other throwers that use 2× 18650 and these end up creating a pretty large light thats much less easy to put on a belt or bag. I like the extra diameter too in the Catapult V6.

This would be a nice choice for security guard applications, landowners looking to survey their property at a distance, or hunters trying to spot game. Due to that tight beam it’s not the best choice for a general EDC light or trail hiking in my opinion but that is to be expected. Overall it’s a very nice compact thrower.

Thrunite is offering 20% off if you order this light through their website through June 15th 2018http://www.thrunite.com/thrunite-catapult-v6-mini-thrower-rechargeable-flashlight/ It’s also available on Amazon (at normal prices) but currently out of stock.

Lumintop ODF30 (26650 Flood, XPH 70.2, 3500 Lumens)

It’s been a long time since I have tested a Lumintop Light. Today I have the Lumintop ODF30 to take a look at. It’s a palm sized flood light that runs off of a 26650 battery using a Cree XHP 70.2 LED for an impressive 3500 lumens in Turbo. Thanks to Banggood for sending this to me, let’s take a closer look.

Full Image Gallery: https://imgur.com/a/jcyMafN

YouTube Version of this Review: (How do you like my new background?)

Packaging
The Lumintop packaging is very nice. The ODF30 comes in a nicely refind brown box with some details on the rear, the accessories including extra orings, orange lanyard, and holster are in a small separate box. The light itself is in a custom fit foam insert with a piece of clear plastic covering the lense. A 26650 battery is not included.






Construction
This light is made from aluminum and is finished with a dry flat black anodizing. Starting at the tail cap, It is flat and non magnetic. The light does tail stand well. Grip on the tail cap and body is blocky. It’s large milled squares in what I would call medium grip. It’s a unique look that I have not seen many other lights. The light doesn’t have any anitroll features built in.The light does come into two pieces, as it’s glued to the head.


The button is a positive click, covered by a rubber button. The head itself has quite a bit of groves for heat dissipation around it. On top the light has a polished steel bezel that’s smooth. The lens is a clear fairly thick mineral glass that’s not anti reflective coated. There is the signature Lumintop Red Oring that’s visible too.The reflector itself is pretty deep and has a nice orange peel on it. The LED below is nicely centered with a large dome on it.


Threads are square cut and anodized. My orings were greased but the threads were not. There is only one spring in the light connected to the driver board. The tail cap has a proud brass contact. Batteries are installed with the positive side facing the front of the light. I was using a KeepPower Protected 26650 and it’s a bit too long and dented the positive end slightly.

Length, Width, Weights, IPX
Maximum Length lenght is 119.5mm, maximum diameter at the head is 42mm, minimum diameter is 29.32mm on the body. Weight with the KeepPower 4500mAh battery I was running is 236 Grams or 133 Grames without battery. The light is rated for IPX8.

LED + Temps + Runtime
This light uses a Cree XHP 70.2 LED in cool white. It has a large dome on the LED. The LED didn’t have a Cree Rainbow as other XHP 70’s I have had have. Edges on the beam shots were fairly well controlled and it’s mostly a flood beam.

Runtimes were impressive for the ODF30. Turbo is timed to 3 minutes during which time it heats up. High lasted quite a while at about 20 minutes. Output did sag a little (still above 90% relative output) but before it stepped down to middle output. Middle output was about 140 minutes at about 65% output. At the end instead of stepping down and running on low the light seems to do a flashing a few times and shutting off. When it shut off it was still pretty warm to the touch, borderline uncomfortable. I used a KeepPower 26650 battery with this light that was rated for 4500mah.
 (Forget the slight dip upfront I had a problem with my sphere)

I ran another test 30 minutes from Turbo and generated an output curve for that shows that 3 minutes more in depth. You get a drop off pretty quickly but then it slows down the output drops taking slow steps. After about 8 minutes the light is pretty stedy for the remaining 35 minutes. At the end here the light was hot. I measured it at 124F uncooled which is uncomfortable to hold onto. If I was holding this I would have turned it down well before it got this hot. Parasitic Drain was measured at 3.2uA

UI
Ui is overly simple on this light. Low, medium, high in that order. When in high, double click to go to turbo. Eco mode (Still too high for my taste) is accessed when the light is off by long pressing the button till the light comes on. To shut it off while on requires a long press (2 seconds). Tho light also has Strobe but it can only be accessed from Eco Mode by double clicking to reach strobe. I like that strobe isn’t a part of the main group but this is a little awkward.

Lockout mode is also available. When the light is off long press for 4 seconds and the light will flash to enter lockout. To unlock requires unscrewing the tail cap. That’s certainly a different way to unlock and it’s not my favorite. Unscrewing the tail cap to mechanically lock it out seems more intuitive to me.

The light has low voltage reminder by flashing the LED under the button. This is a little hard to see if you don’t notice it. It comes on under 3V.

Compared to the Thrunite TC20
Size wise this is pretty similar to my Thrunite TC20 I reviewed. Both are floods with similar beam patterns. The Thrunite is a bit more expensive but it includes a 26650 battery, has onboard charging and is available with a Neutral white LED. Size wise they are very similar, I would give a slight advantage in build feel to the Lumintop. For me the Thrunite wins by a hair due to the neutral white LED which I prefer. Brightness wise to the eyes they are very similar.

Conclusion
This is a nicely built handheld flood. I like the 26650 format. It fits nicely in the hand while providing a large amount of light for whatever task you need. This makes a great handheld hiking/camping light with it’s long runtime or around the house work light/emergency light too. It’s not something most people will EDC in a pocket due to its size but it would work on the included holster for this. The XHP 70.2 LED in this is largely free of artifacts and color abnormalities I have seen with other similar lights.

For me lack of onboard charging isn’t a big deal because I have a few chargers that can accomodate 26650 cells. I would prefer the light to be slightly longer and use springs on both ends so that it doesn’t dent a protected battery that’s are a little longer. I would also like to see polarity markings. None of these are deal breakers nor do they detract much from a nice light. I do like that the 26650 battery format is starting to gain wider use in more and more lights.

Thanks to Banggod for sending this light for me to review. They have offered me some coupons if if you are interested in this light be sure to check them out.

Get $13 off the Lumintop ODF30 with coupon code: b3131d at https://goo.gl/cN2WBH

Get $2 off the KeepPower 26650 battery with coupon code: 6e5463 at https://goo.gl/rsf2Wx

8% off universal coupon for flashlight @ Banggood using code? Forolinternas

FiTorch M30R Tactical Flashlight (1800 Lumens, 18650, USB Recharging/Powerbank)

A few weeks back I reviewed the FiTorch ER16 and was impressed with it. FiTorch is a relatively new brand but the execution of their design and manufacture is like they have been doing it for years. Today I have the new FiTorch M30R to look at. This is a full size tactical light that emphasizes USB recharging. Thanks to FiTorch for sending me an early release example.

Full Image Gallery For this Review: https://imgur.com/a/FqkZ5KA

YouTube Version of this Review: https://youtu.be/jguBIVzJe3k

Packaging & Accessories

Packaging on the FiTorch is typical hanging style retail box and filled with lots of product information on all of the sides.

 Inside the light comes comes with several extras.  First you get a button top 3400mah FiTorch branded battery, that’s also microUSB rechargeable itself. Next lanyard with stop button, an extra rear center button and oring.  The light include a nice holster. It’s nylon but has an inner layer of neoprene padding. It has a velcro front closure and a button belt loop with no D-Ring.   Lastly the light includes a microUSB to full size USB port to allow you use the light as a powerbank to charge a portable electronic.  I like this adapter with the included keychain better then larger cable that the ER16 had.

Construction

The construction of the FiTorch M30R is quite nice. Machining, fit and finish are is on par with Olight I would say.  The light is made from aluminium and hard anodized in a semi gloss finish. Starting at the head of the flashlight it has a crenelated raw aluminium bezel with fairly sharp edges. The lens is thick glass that doesn’t appear to have traditional anti reflective coating on it. The reflector is deep and smooth. The LED is nicely centered. The head has some nice milled areas in it that are for style mostly, Below that is the multifunction aluminum button with the LED indicator ring around it. It has a nice concentric circle pattern milled into it. Directly opposite the button is the micro USB port that can be used to charge the light or for it to use as a powerbank function.  This USB port is at normal depth and standard cables can be used.

The barrel of the light has the concentric grip pattern that I liked on the ER16. It looks great but isn’t the most grippy and worth noting on a tactical light. The clip is stiff, removable, but non reversible and non deep carry. The tail cap has more of the concentric grip with 6 areas milled out to provide more grip.

The very back of the tail has a rotating ring that has a locked, unlocked, locked position. This is a mechanical lock for the paddle switches on the very end that activate strobe. The detent is fairly light and I would like to see just a little more detent on these as it’s fairly easy for this to rotate. The very back of the light has a raised rubber button in the center that is On/Off in turbo. There are also two paddles on either side that activate strobe. More on this in the UI section of the review. There are also two loops where a lanyard can be added. Normal sized paracord should fit here but it would be a bit tight. Due to the center button this light won’t tail stand well. Threads on the tail cap are ACME cut and orings are beefy. They came nicely greased. On the inside there are springs on each end, on the tail cap it’s a dual spring. The light uses a dual wall construction similar to the Olight M2R. The head is not removable.

Size + Weight

This isn’t a small light. This is noticed most in the length that came in at 163mm, width at it’s largest point is 37mm in the head, and minimum diameter is 24mm on the body tube. Weight was 216g With the included battery. It is IPX8 rated and drop resistant to 2M. If I compare it in size to the Olight M2R the M30R is quite a bit larger in all dimensions.  The two are both tactical lights but the M2R is still EDC able where for me at I would need to use the pouch that came with the M30R on my belt to be considered an EDC.

LED + Runtimes

This light uses a Cree XHP 35 HD LED in cool white.  It has a deep smooth reflector covered with a thick mineral glass lens that does not have an anti reflective coating. The driver uses constant current so flicker isn’t an issue. Modes spacing is as follows.

Turbo is 1800 Lumens, High is 460 Lumens, Medium is 130 Lumens, Low is 20 Lumens. Strobe is 1800 Lumens, SOS is 460 Lumens. This is pretty even to the eye which I like. This light does a really nice fade between modes which I really like.

Beamshot has a small defined hotspot with rings as it spreads out on the spill.  I think these are the creation of the reflector and the front bezel’s polished nature. With the hot spot this light throws well as you would expect for a general purpose tactical light. FiTorch claims 328 meters. I measured parasitic drain at at 1.7uA.

Like most lights this timed down from turbo after about 4 minutes and ran at 48% of output for about 95 minutes. Further step downs were done in small steps over about 20 minutes.  That is nice you don’t have sudden fall offs of light output other then turbo. Total runtime was 170 minutes before LVP kicked in.

UI

The UI of this light is easiest to understand if we split it into what each button does. Starting at the front the multimode button is the normal flashlight modes and functions. From off if you press the side switch for about 1 second to turn it on in Low, quick presses will then allow you to move up in modes through medium, high, and turbo. Instead of cycling over, once you reach turbo pressing again will go to medium and continue down. Think of it as ramping but not infinite brightness. Strobe and SOS are not part of the main mode group. To activate them when the light is on a quick double click will go to strobe or SOS. To get the other (Strobe or SOS) exit by pressing and holding the button and then enter the Strobe SOS mode again with a double click. Pressing the button quickly 3 times from off will show a voltage check via the LED indicator ring and turn the light on low. The light also has a location beacon mode that flashes on and off every few second using the indicator ring and to activate that press 4 times in the off position.

The rear 3 switches are used for tactical mode in addition to the lock ring on the tail cap. When locked only the center button is able to work. The center button is a direct to turbo full 1800 lumens. When you unlock the tactical lock ring each of the paddles are capable of working in strobe at a full 1800 lumens. These work no matter what mode the light is in. So if you were in low mode and needed turbo just press the center button, and if it was unlocked just press a paddle to get to strobe.

No special batteries are required for this light to work. Flat tops work, as well as NCR18650B, so no high drain cells are required for Turbo. 2X CR123A are also an option for this light but it’s not rated for higher then 6V so two 18350 isn’t an option.

Charging

Apart from its tactical side, this light is all about USB recharging. On the light itself it has a Micro USB port  that allows for recharging at 2A speed. The button indicator  is blinking green during charging and solid green when charged before it shuts off. All tests were performed using the included FiTorch 3500mah battery and supplied cable, with an Anker QuickCharge 3.0 power adapter. Charging time from LVP cutoff to 100% using the external USB port was took 2 hours and 20 minutes. Most of the charging was between 1.8 and 2A.

The battery also has the ability to recharge directly via micro USB  but it’s much slower then recharging in the light. It has a Red and Green LED on top of the battery to give indication of charging or charged. I tested with the same charger as above but only received a maximum charging speed of 0.82A, and decreased as the battery reached capacity. Total time was a relatively long 5 hours 32 minutes.

The light can also be used to recharge another electronic device via the MicroUSB to full size USB adapter  and the appropriate cable for your device. I tested with my phone and was able to charge my Note 8 from 28% to 81% at 1.7A charging speed during this time the light got warm to the touch. While in powerbank mode you can use the light in low or medium modes as well.

Pro

  • Standard depth micro USB port allowing the use of standard cables.

  • Really nice machining and fit and finish.

  • Very nice fade between modes.

Con

  • I would like to see a strong detent on the strobe lockout from the tail switch.

  • I would like to see the Location beacon setting be a bit smoother in its on and off, similar to the Astrolux MF01.

Summary

FiTorch is definitely an up and coming brand that is paying a lot of attention to detail and execution in their machining and tolerances. As a newer brand they are doing a better job of this then many of the older brands they compete with. My hope is that they will start to offer some Neutral White LED options in the near future.

The M30R is a nice light, that’s designed with a purpose. This isn’t your typical in the pocket EDC light. Instead it’s designed for a more tactical use. Personally I am not a big user of strobe. However if you are the rear lockout allows you to get to strobe very easily. I wish this detent was a bit stronger so that it’s less easy to activate strobe. The interface is decent, with room for improvement. I like how the USB recharging is fast and uses a standard depth connector so a standard cable can be used. The LED and reflector combo seem to create a slight donut at distance that I can tell on wall, but less so outside. Overall a nice light for those needing tactical above practical.

Banggood has offered a discount coupon for $36 off the FiTorch M30R using the following link https://goo.gl/6EpH25 with coupon ‘a03396’ Learn more at http://www.fitorchworld.com/index.php?case=archive&act=show&aid=93

Folomov A4 Review

I previously have tested the Folomov EDC C4 flashlight and thought it was solid. Folomov also makes chargers and here is their largest, fastest charging model, the Folomov A4, that’s capable of a combined 8A across the slots with a max per slot of 3A.

Full Image Gallery: https://imgur.com/a/ooUgsp4
YouTube Version of this Review: 

Build Quality Build quality seems pretty solid no major complaints. It’s injection molded ABS plastic. It’s sturdy and seams fit together nicely. On the back is the 12V input connector. It’s a little loose in the connection and with the included power supply doesn’t fit quite as far in as I would like. On the bottom there are what look to be vent holes but they are purely cosmetic as they are not cut through to allow air flow nor is there a fan. 

I did have one issue with one of the spring loaded slots with the spring coming disconnected. I was able to easily disassemble and reattach it. The spring slots are a little rough when you pull them back, not as smooth as my Xtar VC4 or Nitecore chargers. That said they work well on a wide variety of cells, anything I tried including a 20700.




The display is inverse of many LCD panels. It’s background is black and the display characters are white. It’s easy to read and decent sized. I like that each cell gets it’s own dedicated spot on the display and you get the voltage all the time.

One thing I wish it did have was little rubber feet. I like to charge on a piece of granite tile and all my other chargers have rubber feet that keeps them from sliding around the table when inserting cells, the Folomov A4 doesn’t so you need to hold onto it with one hand while installing a cell with the other.

Display & UI
When you plug in the charger if there isn’t a cell in the slot you get a “null” message. Upon putting in a cell it will default to 250ma charging which is slow. You just have to press the button once and it goes to 500ma, press again for 1000ma, again for 2000ma, and again for 3000mah if available. The UI here is a little slow, you can’t double click to jump up in rates faster you have to press and wait. It’s not that big of deal for me but something to know about. Each bay is independent as well.

Instead of working from a bank of 8A and the charger deducting amounts as you insert cells, this charger let’s you set each bay as high as you want and takes power from other cells. For example say I charge Bay 1 at 3A, Bay 2 at 3A, it would let me insert a cell into Bay 3 and set it to 3A but since that’s over 8A total it would reduce Bay 1 to 2A without letting you know.

The charger will then analyze the cell and during this analysis phase the capacity in percentage you get may not be true. This is why I prefer voltage to look at. The same holds true for when it’s full. It will sit for quite a while at 98-99% at 4.2V on a lithium ion battery before ticking over to 100%. Not entirely sure why this is. It includes overvoltage protection too, a nice bit of safety. The charger also has 0V activation which I did not test.

How does it handle different sized cells
The A4 handles a wide variety of sizes of cells with ease. I tried everything from normal NiHM AAA, AA cells, to 16340, flat top 18350, and all the different types of 18650’s that I have including protected, unprotected, flat tops and button tops. I also tried a button top protected 26650 without an issue. Spacing on the A4 is large between bays so it can accept 4× 26650 at once which is fantastic as many 4 bay chargers can only accept two at a time.

The AC/DC adapter is a separate piece, it looks like a laptop style power supply. It’s fairly large and has long cables. It’s rated for 110-240V input power. Since this does look like a laptop power supply and it is not branded as Folomov, my advice would be to label the charger so you don’t get it mixed up with something else you may have.

Conclusion
This is a fairly simple charger but is fast for both Li-Ion and Nimh batteries. I would rate it as a good charger but not the best charger. It’s UI is a bit slow when changing charging rates. It seems to hit a wall at 98% with the last 2 percent taking longer than it feels like it should. It has a large external power supply but lots of cord length. The connector into the charger is looser then I would like. However these slight negatives are outweighed by the nice white text, black background LCD Screen, and total of 8A charge capacity, with a maximum of 3A per slot upto 8A total. I like how it can charge a wide selection of sizes of batteries and chemistries it can take. This is a safe charger that does the job well. I can recommend it as a good value fast charger.

Pick it up on Amazon (Referral) if you are interested.