Thrunite Catapult Mini Review (680 Lumens, 89,000 Candela, 18350)

Today I have a shortened review of the new Thrunite Catapult Mini, a handheld thrower running an Osram LED and a 18350 battery. While not super bright in number off lumens, the light really throws well for its very small size. Thanks to Thrunite for sending this to me to take a quick look at and review.

 

Watch this review on YouTube:  

Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/liquidretro/ 

Join the Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/LiquidretroReviews/ 

Enjoy this review? Buy me a Coffee/Beer: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/Liquidretro

 

Get the Thrunite Catapult Mini on Amazon (Save 20% by clicking the coupon on the page)

Gray https://amzn.to/3ma0JAD

Black https://amzn.to/3yEHWAA

ThruNite Store: https://amzn.to/37zrsOj

 

Accessories

Packaging is the standard Thrunite box. Here is a photo of all the accessories the light comes with. It’s nice to see them include the spare button and port covers still, that’s not something every manufacture is still doing in 2021. 

 

Short overview of construction

The Catapult mini is available in 2 colors black and gray, and I have gray here. It’s made from 6061 T6 aluminum and nicely anodized. Despite it’s small size, they didn’t skimp out on machining quality. The light separates into 3 pieces easily, and it does stand on it’s flat, non magnetic tail. The body tube has the squares milled into it like we saw on the Thrunite TT20 but deeper, and it’s non reversible. 

The body head section uses the standard Thrunite button with LED indicator in the center, and USB-C charging port opposite with a silicone cover. The head itself is the largest part of the light, with a small flat bezel. The bezel does unscrew easily to remove the lens and optic, which should make this light fairly easy to mod if you wish. 

The Lens itself is covered by glass, with a plastic TIR style optic below. This optic reminds me of some of them I have seen on some of my larger Acebeams as well, it helps diffuse the beam a bit but still create that nice hot center and throw. 

 

Comparison with other lights

LED & Beam

The light is using an Osram KW.CSLNM1.TG in Cool white, but to my eyes it’s definitely more neutral than cold. The beam is extremely focused, it has the slightest amount of spill that fades very smoothly without artifacts. It’s a great beam profile for a mini thrower. No PWM was observed on any of the 5 modes.

 

Outputs are listed officially at 

  • Turbo – 680 Lumens
  • High – 235 Lumens
  • Medium – 96 Lumens
  • Low – 21 Lumens
  • Firefly – 0.5 Lumens
  • Strobe – 680 Lumens
  • 89,600 Candela

Night Shots

Heat and Runtime

Turbo on this light lasted for 1 minute before step down, maximum temp was reached at 1:30 at 35C so it gets warm pretty quickly but not in the danger zone. From there the light steps down to about 35% relative output where it will run for 2 hours before running in firefly mode for another 30 minutes or so. Total runtime was 2:30:00. Nothing here surprising. 

 

UI & Recharge

The UI here is standard Thrunite, 3 main modes with firefly at the bottom, and turbo at the top with memory for the main modes. Long press from off to access firefly, double click to access turbo, triple click to access strobe. 

Recharging is accomplished with the onboard USB-C port. It is incompatible with C to C charging or PD charging and requires an A to C charging cable that’s supplied. This is disappointing in 2021. Charging is on the conservative time, it took 2 hours even to charge the included 1100mAh 18350 battery from LVP at 3.035V to full at 4.145v. Total charge rate was about 0.6A. While charging you can use all modes on the light.

One quick note about the battery, it has the positive and negative terminal on the one end of the battery like you see with many brands these days. However in this case you don’t actually need it to use or charge the battery in the light. That’s great news. I tested with a flat top unprotected Keeppower battery and had no issues.

Conclusion

Pocket thrower flashlights seem to be the popular type this year. I found the Thrunite Catapult Mini to be a good performer, especially for it’s size. While not the brightest in terms of lumens it really does throw impressively. I seem to say this a lot but non flashlight people will be impressed with how far you can reach with such a small light. I remember using a 6D Cell Maglight as a kid because it could go so far, it was huge and weighed a ton. This little light outperforms it in all ways, at a pretty affordable price. 

 

I do wish Thrunite would go back to offering more Neutral and even Warm LED tints when they launch new products. They were one of the only manufactures doing this but have seemed to get away from it recently. That said I would call the tint here pretty neutral, so about perfect despite the box saying cool white. 

 

I like the Thrunite Catapult Mini and can recommend it. Everyone needs a pocket thrower, and this is a good choice thats a lot of fun, and comes in a color other then black, if you want that. Thrunite has good customer support too should you ever need it, and best yet it’s on sale for around the $40 price point at the time of filming this video. So if your interested please check the link in the description to see where you can purchase it at. 

 

Get the Thrunite Catapult Mini on Amazon (Save 20% by clicking the coupon on the page)

Gray https://amzn.to/3ma0JAD

Black https://amzn.to/3yEHWAA

ThruNite Store: https://amzn.to/37zrsOj

Olight Warrior Mini 2 Review (1750 Lumens, Listening to user feedback)

Todays’ video is on the brand new Olight Warrior Mini 2. Olight took feedback from the community on the original Warrior Mini, which I have done 2 previous videos on, and made some changes for the Warrior Mini 2. The Mini 2 follows in a similar manner on how Olight upgraded the S2R Baton II, into the Baton Pro with it gaining in length and features. Olight did send the new Warrior Mini 2 to me to review it and help promote their flash sale that starts tonight at 7pm Eastern Time. I will explain the sale further on in this review, but do know that if you’re interested in anything, using my link below will help the channel, and if you’re watching after the sale is over, I will have a code below where you can save 10% off regular prices. This will be a longer review, but it has chapters so make sure to skip around to see the parts your most interested in.

 

Watch this review on YouTube: 

Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/liquidretro/ 

Join the Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/LiquidretroReviews/ 

Enjoy this review? Buy me a Coffee/Beer: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/Liquidretro

 

Warrior Mini 2 Flash Sale Link: http://bit.ly/WarriorMini2FS

Warrior Mini  2 Bundle Flash Sale Link: http://bit.ly/WarriorMini2Bundle

Olight Flash Sale General Link: https://bit.ly/OlightLiquidRetro

 

10% OFF Coupon code: LQ10 Coupon Code will work during sales on non-sale listings only.

 

A little bit about that flash sale before we get into the review. It starts June 17th at 7pm Central time and it runs for 24 hours. You can get the Black or Tan Warrior Mini 2 for 35% off $67.46 during that time. They will also have a Warrior Mini 2 Mountain Sky limited edition color for $71.21. There are bundles for all 3 with the i3T Mountain Sky edition too for a few more dollars. Other sale items include the Odin which I have reviewed previously, the new Olantern Mini, and some Mega packs of Olight products. If you order during the flash sale you will also get a free Olight Fathers day Mini tool. 

 

Packaging & Accessories

Standard Olight packaging applies here with the white boxes, and nice glossy photo, and full of tons of information on the back. Inside is a pull out try with the light including the yellow read me card to help you get the basics of your light down and ensure success.

Accessories that come with the light are the warrior Mini 2 itself, Olight custom and proprietary 3500mAh 18650 battery (ORB-186C35), the MCC3A magnetic charger, lanyard, and carabiner style ring as well as a manual. 

Construction

Construction quality is typical Olight, quality machining, fit and finish with the design and anodizing here. The tail is a one piece design with the body tube, so the battery goes in only from the head side. The button on the rear is all metal exterior construction and features the tri lug design we have seen on other recent “tactical models allowing the button to be pressed more easily with gloves. It’s also magnetic but not strong enough to hold the light horizontally on the few painted metal surfaces I tested, it does tail stand though. The button itself is spongy, and fairly stiff. It’s a two stage actuation which I like quite a bit from a UI perspective but it takes a bit of muscle memory to know how hard to press to get into that first lower output mode. 

The texture on the body is aggressive but not sharp in the hand. I really like the feel of it. The downside is it’s aggressive enough to tear up pockets with pulled in and out during repeated use. Threads are smooth, square cut and nicely greased. Up until this point it’s all the same as the Warrior Mini. The one difference on the body tube is the addition of a pocket/lanyard clip indention at the rear of the light. I’ll talk about the options this opens up during the retention section of the review.

The head internally has a single short spring in the center, and then a ring with pogo pins for making contact with the proprietary batteries negative terminal on the top. This is the same basic design as the Warrior Mini, and the heads are in fact interchangeable. On the exterior the clip is captured. The button is the same as Olight has used in recent models with the LED underneath to indicate battery charge status. It can display, Green, Orange, and Yellow. 

The head is what’s the most different on the Warrior Mini 2, over the outgoing model. It’s longer overall, with an aluminum bezel that protects the glass lens (yes). Inside is still a TIR style optic, but a little different style, it’s deeper and has a clear center instead of a bubble center. There is also the proximity sensor in the bezel, it doesn’t have a noticeable effect on beam quality. 

Is it Safe?

Since I know this is what a lot of you are wondering I will make it it’s own section but talk more about how the proximity sensor and UI works in the LED and UI sections. The video is really best for this part where I demonstrate all this, so make sure to check that out. So let’s take a black synthetic sock and put it over the lens of the light to show what happens and that this one won’t melt any clothing. I will speed this footage up a bit to show that after stepdown the light will shut off after 1 minute if the lens is still blocked. I wasn’t able to get anything to make the tail cap turn the light on with a high resistance metal object. I tried Keys, Ball Chain, Coins, etc. 

Size and Weight

I measured the overall length at 118mm, minimum diameter at the tail at 23.3g, and maximum diameter at the head at 25mm.Weight with the battery and main pocket clip installed is 120g. The light is IPX8 water rated and drop rated for 1.5M. So the light grew in length by 11mm and weight by 15g over the original Warrior Mini that I have in the same accessory configuration. 

 

Retention

You have some new retention options from Olight with the Warrior Mini 2, First up is the pocket clip, this is similar to the one on the original Warrior mini, being that it’s a dual direction clip and can be used to clip onto a hat to use as a make shift headlamp, but the new clip on the Mini 2 is longer by 13mm. It can also now mount on the rear of the light if you wish for a no show deep carry carry. In the top position the clip is captured and won’t rotate, but when mounted on the tail cap it can rotate. The fit here is tight though so it takes effort.

It also has a clip style attachment for a lanyard point which can be mounted anywhere the clip can be mounted too. You can use the included lanyard here or on the clip if you wish. Or you can use the new Carabiner style ring and put a finger through it so you don’t drop the light. Both of these retention options will fit on either the top or the bottom of the light.

 

LED & Beam

The LED being used in the Warrior Mini 2 is the SST40 in a 6000-7000k tint. It has a little green tinge on the lowest modes but once you apply more power that fades substantially.  I have no problems with the SST40 LED but wish one of the neutral tint bins was used here. 

The beam is good through the TIR optic despite having the proximity sensor taking up some of the available room. There is a glass lens here, instead of the one piece plastic Lens/TIR optic that the Warrior Mini used. This, combined with the proximity sensor should eliminate the melting lens and clothing issues the original light had. 

Warrior Mini 2 on the Left, Original Warrior Mini on the Right

 

Overall the beam here is great for EDC in my opinion with a medium to large hot spot and quite a bit of spill, good for close up and medium to far range. With the tail switch this would be a good option to do a one handed grip of your weapon and have the light nearby in the opposite hand (Harris or Chapman style) if you wished. The one downside more of the light sticks up out of your pocket here with heads up carry which are key to those grips. 

 

Olight lists the official output modes as:

  • Turbo – 1750 – 500 – 200 Lumens with step downs.
  • High – 500 – 200 Lumens
  • Medium – 120 Lumens
  • Low – 15 Lumens
  • Moon – 1 Lumen

Turbo sees a slight bump with the Warrior Mini 2 as does the step down modes in Turbo and High outputs. The stepdown upgrades are only 30 lumens so it’s really hard to notice but the extra 250 on Turbo you can notice slightly. There is a very small amount of PWM that I can detect with my oscilloscope on Low mode, on all the other modes no PWM was detected. 

 

For Night Shots, please see the video.

 

Runtime & Heat

One minor annoyance with the proximity sensor is it’s made testing runtimes very difficult because even in High the light will shut off after 1 minute when it detects an obstruction doesn’t move. The white surfaces of my test rig reflect light well and make this feature turn the light off, and not step down. So I improvised and used a dark room with the light testing sensor about 3 feet away.

 

Olight lists turbo as lasting for 4 minutes on the Mini 2, and as you can see from my graph that lines up very well with what I saw, you only get top output for a minute before it steps down to 29% relative output over the next 3 minutes. After that it runs for 208 minutes (Exactly what the manual says) before stepping down 2 more times. Total runtime was 4:20:00. LVP on the battery was 2.75V. Max temp I saw during this time was 54C at 1:45, but during the bulk of the runtime the light ran about 41C. I also ran a runtime on medium and got numbers that were within 2% of Olight’s claimed runtime. I have every reason to believe Olight is telling the truth here. 

 

UI

The UI on the Warrior Mini 2 is the same that’s was on the Olight original Mini. It has 2 buttons for operation, first the two stage tail switch which is the more tactical operation, and then the standard silicone button up front for normal uses. It follows Olights basic UI for the most part. 

 

When you half press the tail button, you get medium in configuration 1, and then turbo 1750  lumens when you full press. This is in configuration 1, In configuration 2 the tail switch goes to turbo on half press and strobe on full press. 

 

UI is similar to other Olights but with some differences. Long press from Off to go to moon light mode, Double click to go to Turbo, and Triple click to go to strobe.There the front eswitch is mostly used as a mode switch but can be used to turn the light on and off from off as well.

 

The proximity sensor on the Warrior Mini 2 is the first time they have got it right in my opinion and I have not wanted to disable or remove it to make the light better. What they did right was to give the programming the ability to step the light down to safe outputs and temps if the lens is obstructed, but then step back up the light to its previous level when that obstruction is removed. It’s super simple, but no previous Olights that I have reviewed with proximity sensors have worked this way. The sensor is also unable to be disabled on this light from what I can tell. One minor annoyance with the proximity sensor is it’s made testing runtimes very difficult because even in High the light will shut off after 1 minute when it detects an obstruction. 

I would be a fool` for not mentioning that the Warrior Mini 2 has a lockout mode after what happened with the original Warrior Mini. I am sure Olight would like me to mention you should use lockout when carrying this light in your pocket. The manual does mention to lock the light if it’s left unused or carried to avoid accidental activation. To enable lockout hold the front button for about 3 seconds, when off, moonlight will turn on and then off to let you know it’s activated. The same will deactivate it. You can’t mechanically unscrew the light to stop any parasitic drain on the light, the light will work if any threads are engaged in the head of it. 

 

Recharging

Nothing new to report on the recharging front with the Warrior Mini 2. It comes with Olights newest MCC 2A charging system which is faster and denoted with the red ring inside. The magnetic charging system is convenient and easy but does require a proprietary battery (3500mAh in this case) and the Warrior Mini 2 is no different. The proprietary Olight battery goes with the positive terminal facing the head in this light though which isn’t always the case. This battery doesn’t have a plastic ring that stands proud and can be charged in a conventional charger like the Vapcel S4 Plus, or various Xtar chargers I have reviewed in the past. I did test the capacity of the included 3500mAh battery at 3398mAh so a little short of the rating but not too bad.

I saw total charging time take 2:35:00, and as usually my charging monitoring system doesn’t like the drops in current that the MCC chargers do so my graph is incomplete. Max charge rate I saw was 1.3A at 1:16:00 mark. Once full the battery measured 4.2145V. LVP was measured at 2.75V.

 

Pro’s

  • I like that you can mount the clip either near the front or the rear of the light but you pay in overall length.
  • Glass Lens = No melted lens issues
  • Proximity sensor here means the light isn’t going to melt clothing or damage itself, and the programming here is good
  • I couldn’t get the light  to come on with stuff in my pocket on accident via the rear contacts.
  • New carry option with the ability to mount the clip on the rear of the light, and new retention options.

 

Con’s

  • Longer than the Warrior Mini, which makes it less appealing to EDC in my opinion, but it’s safer to carry too.
  • Still cool white only options
  • Name, I would have called this the Warrior Mini Pro to mirror what Olights done with the Baton line.

 

Conclusion

So if you follow this channel and I hope that you do, you will know I have done 2 previous videos on the previous model light, the Warrior Mini. Overall I liked the light but it had a few issues, that occurred when the light came on accidentally while in people pockets for various reasons. This resulted in melted lenses and a few melted pieces of clothing. Well with the Warrior Mini 2, Olight solved that problem by using a glass lens and installing a proximity sensor, and I think their implementation here of those is good. 

On past Olight models, I have not been a fan of the proximity sensor, but on the Warrior Mini 2 I think they got the programming right to where it provides added protection so you don’t melt your clothing or burn yourself if the light comes on accidentally, but still let’s the light be useable since when the obstruction is removed from the lens the light goes back to its original brightness.

I wouldn’t have called this light the Warrior Mini 2, and instead called it the Warrior Mini Pro because it’s s similar upgrade on what Olight did with the S2R Baton II and Baton Pro, where output was increased as well as overall length. You don’t notice the brightness change much on the Warrior Mini 2 but the increase in length is noticeable, if you choose to EDC. 

Overall the Warrior Mini 2 is a nice light, and a good upgrade over the original with more performance, and more importantly it fixes the flaws in the original light with the added proximity sensor. This makes for a better flashlight thats much safer to use. I just wish it wouldn’t have grown in length as much as it did. 

So if you have made it this far you might be considering picking up this light, and if you are the flashsale that starts tonight June 17th will be the best time to pick up the light during Olights Flash sale and introduction of the Warrior Mini 2.

 

Sale Details

You have 3 colors of Warrior Mini 2 available on the sale. Black and Tan for $67.46 and Mountain Sky for $71.21. For about $4 more you can get a bundle with the I3T mountain sky edition too.

Odins are back in Black and gray for $118 and $125 respectively. There are bundle deals with Obulbs and the new Olantern Mini’s too.

Olantern Mini is being released for the first time in Black and Red for 25% off $44.96 and has a bundle option for the I1R 2 in Desert Tan.

There are also Mega Packs and Free tiers too to get free products or save more. Everyone who buys something will get a free Fathers day Multitool too. 

 

Warrior Mini 2 Flash Sale Link: http://bit.ly/WarriorMini2FS

Warrior Mini  2 Bundle Flash Sale Link: http://bit.ly/WarriorMini2Bundle

Olight Flash Sale General Link: https://bit.ly/OlightLiquidRetro

 

10% OFF Coupon code: LQ10 Coupon Code will work during sales on non-sale listings only.

Lumintop Gift G1 Review (A flashlight made from TurboGlow?)

What would happen if you took an AA Lumintop Tool and made the body out of TurboGlow instead of metal? Well that’s what we basically have here with the Lumintop Gift-G1 a flashlight where most of the light is made out of TurboGlow and copper. It’s available in a number of colors and has both Cree and Nichia emitter options too. Thanks to Lumintop for sending this to me to review. It’s a fun light so let’s take a closer look.

 

Watch this review on YouTube: 

Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/liquidretro/ 

Join the Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/LiquidretroReviews/ 

Enjoy this review? Buy me a Coffee/Beer: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/Liquidretro

 

Get 20% off the Gift G2 by using the coupon code 20G1GiftOFF at https://www.lumintoponline.com/lumintop-gift-g1-turbo-glow-600-lumens-edc-tactical-flashlight-p3430046.html

 

Packaging & Accessories

The Gift-G1 comes in a small cardboard box with minimal information on it, on the back you have the emitter chosen and the body color of the light. Inside accessories include the light itself, yellow lanyard, 2 spare orings. A glow ring and 14500 battery are both optional. No pocket clip is included with the light, more on that in a minute. 

Construction

The Gift-G1 is made from TuboGlow with an internal aluminum sleeve for electrical conductivity, and at the head, the pill is made from raw copper. TurboGlow if you don’t know is the premium solid glow in the dark material. It has a much longer glow life then normal glow in the dark material. While there are several color choices available, especially with the Gift-G1 such as Lava, Red, Rainbow, Pink, Purple, Blue, and Green, I went with green because it’s the brightest color that lasts the longest. 

 

The tail cap has a semi translucent black button inside and it has RGB LED’s underneath. These LED’s come on when you have a liion battery (14500) in the light, so you get a neat effect on the sides of the LED’s slowly fading between Red, Blue, and Green. 

Internally the parts are the same as the AA Tool, and interchangeable if you have both lights. There is an aluminum tube under the TurboGlow for conductivity. At the head of the light there is a exposed raw copper pill with light engraving of the Lumintop name, and model number. It’s a nice functional heat emitter too.

 

Lastly at the front the front bezel is TurboGlow and easily unscrews to expose the TIR style optic. This exposes the MCPCB. This makes the light very easily modded if you wanted to do an emitter swap. 

Size & Weight

I measured the length at 88mm, minimum width on the body at 19.21mm, diameter at the head at 21mm. Diameter of the glow ring is 30mm. Weight with the light, 800mAh Keeppower 14500, and Reylight Lan/Pineapple clip is 70g. The light is IP68 rated. 

 

Retention

The Gift-G1 comes with a yellow lanyard as the only factory supplied retention option, that can be attached via an optional anti roll ring/cigar grip ring. This works if that’s how you want to carry the light like this, but for me if I am going to EDC a light I need a pocket clip, so I went through my lights to see what I had that might work, and I found that the clip from my Reylight Lan/Pineapples V3+ work decently well here, You basically get the entire cap section sticking up out of your pocket (20.5mm) which is a bit much for me, especially when running a 14500 and having the tail cap light up but it’s still better than no pocket clip. 

I should note, with a clip like I had, I had more then one person stop me and said the light in my pocket was on when in fact it was just the tail cap LED’s or TurboGlow glowing. So it did draw some attention to itself.

 

LED & Beam Shots

The Gift G1 here is available with a Cree XP-G3 LED in cool white, or a Nichia 219C LED in Neutral white which is what I choose. It can be powered off of a AA or 14500 battery. I will include a chat here showing the claimed outputs for each emitter and battery combination. 

I found the beam pattern to be nice for EDC, It’s got a medium large hot center with a large dim spill, good for general shorter range and medium range tasks good for maybe 200ft max. One quick note about TurboGlow is it really lasts a lot longer than your traditional GITD material. With this light when you use it, you get light leakage around the front of the light so it continuously charges it. It makes for a lot of fun, kids love it. I found no visible PWM here to the eye or camera. 

 

Heat & Runtime

As mentioned before the light will run from 2 different power sources, either a AA 1.5v battery or a 14500 3.7V battery. You get the best performance and tail cap LED’s only if you run with the Liion 14500 but I did test both battery types.

 

With the 14500 the light stepped down from 100% relative output after 2 minutes and then ran at 55% relative output and declined in a slow manner. To me the curve looks unregulated. Total runtime was 1:10:00 but after this the light staid on in it’s firefly mode for about 2.5 additional hours. Maximum heat I saw was 48C at the 20 minute mark. The exposed copper does a nice job here with heat dissipation and adds some style points too. The light does have LVP. 

I did my AA test with a Amazon Basics High Capacity NiMH battery. These have proven to be good performance in the past, and here we saw a very flat output curve maintaining 98% relative output for 2:12 minutes. Heat here was minimal and I saw the peak being 36C at the end of the runtime. 

 

UI

The UI here is simple, it’s a 4 mode light, starting at the lowest mode. Once on, you can half press the mechanical button to go up in modes. There is a strobe mode, to access that, once the light is on, click give it a half press  6 times to get to strobe. 

 

There is memory when the light is off for 3 seconds this will memorize the setting and the light will come back on to that desired setting. That said my light has a firmware bug, and this only works with a 1.5v battery, if I use the 14500 Liion, memory mode doens’t work. Lumintop confirmed that they are aware and plan to fix it on the next batch of lights.

 

Pro’s

  • Fun
  • Choice of Body colors and Emitter options
  • Good beam profile for EDC

 

Con’s

  • No clip is included, but there are options on the market that fit.
  • The glow ring isn’t included and without it or a clip it leaves a gap on the body of the light.
  • Memory mode firmware bug.

 

Conclusion

The fun with the Gift-G1 is the TurboGlow body, it’s availability in several colors, and the LED’s in the tail cap that change color when using a 14500 battery. Inside it’s basically a Lumintop Tool which is a good EDC style light. For me the let down was no pocket clip, a must on a light this size if I am going to EDC it but luckily the clip from my Reylight Pineapple fit to make it more usable on a daily basis for me. 

I think this would make a great gift, a nice addition to a flasaholics collection since there are very few lights made from so much TurboGlow or a gift for a child (kind of expensive) to get a kid into the hobby if you like. 

ThruNite TN42 V2 Review (SBT 90.2, 4848 Lumens, 4X 21700, USB-C)

Today I have a review of something special from Thrunite, a flashlight that has a giggle factor for really anyone. It’s the Thrunite TN42 V2. It’s a mighty search light featuring 4x 21700 batteries, USB-C charging, and an impressive 4848 lumens from an Luminus SBT90.2 LED. Thanks to Thrunite for sending this out to me to review this beast of a light. 

 

Watch this review on YouTube: 

Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/liquidretro/ 

Join the Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/LiquidretroReviews/ 

Enjoy this review? Buy me a Coffee/Beer: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/Liquidretro

 

Get the Thrunite TN42 V2 on Amazon and Save $89 by using my link https://amzn.to/3olu4qB and clicking the on screen coupon until 5/18/21

Packaging & Accessories

The large TN42 comes packaged in a large Thrunite style brown cardboard box with very minimal information on the exterior. ON the inside the light is nicely secured inside a bag and surrounded with foam. Accessories include a bag of spares with extra orings, port covers and a spare button. You get a shoulder strap that attaches right in front of the button and on the rear tail cap with clips, 4x high performance 4000mAh 21700 batteries, and an AC USB-C charger. The charger has an attractive texture on it, with foldable US plugs, but feels quite light. It says it’s capable of 5V DC 5A.

 

Construction

The light is made from Aluminum and is hard anodized in a smooth semi gloss black. Fit and finish here is as good as I have seen from Thrunite. The tail cap has 3 winglets with 2 openings in each, just large enough to fit paracord in it which I plan to make into a wrist strap since one didn’t come with the light. While it looks like a 2 piece design it doesn’t unscrew so I suspect it’s glued.

The body tube has blocks milled into it for style and grip. Not a lot of either in my opinion but it does the job decently well. There is a large oring at the base of the threads that create a very tight fit. Threads are square cut and nicely greased. Mine had 2 slightly damaged areas but I don’t think this is what makes it somewhat difficult to unscrew. The battery carrier has large diameter single springs at the base and an inner aluminum brace to keep the cells from moving around.

Inside the head is a simple brass contact ring, the light has batteries in parallel so it will run with just 1 battery or all 4. On the exterior of the head you have milling for heat dissipation, on the front you have the larger electronic button with the LED power indicator in the middle. The button has very little play and a good feel for an eswitch. On the back you have the silicon port cover for the USB-C charging port. It’s nicely recessed and stays out of the way. 

The light then grows substantially in diameter to fit the large smooth and deep reflector. The LED is centered well but has plenty of room around it before the reflector starts. The lens is antireflective coated glass and is slightly protected by a bezel with light crenulations allowing light to spill out. Markings are quite minimal on the light which I like, Just the model name on the front bezel and then the ROHS, FC, CE and SN on the back. On mine Kerning on the serial number could be improved.

 

Size and Weight

This is a big boy light, while not the longest I own, it’s does have the largest reflector and front diameter. Length I measured 191mm, Diameter of the body at 60mm, maximum diameter of the head is 104mm, or 4.1”. So it makes a baseball or a 50 BMG look pretty small when placed on the front reflector. Weight with the batteries installed came in at 959g, or 33.84oz or 2.1 lbs. Weight without batteries was 648g. The light is IPX8 water rated, and it’s too big to really test in my sink. 

Some comparison with some other Lights.

 

Thrunite TN42 V2 on the Left, Astrolux FT03S on the Right.

 

Retention

Your retention options here are limited from the factory. The light comes with a shoulder strap that clips into the front of the light above the button and rear tail cap. The front mount is kind of unique in how it mounts, it’s also close to the button but doesn’t interfere. While I am not typically a wrist strap person I think one here would be nice just do to the sheer size of the light and to add a bit more security when holding it. So I will build one with paracord. Let me know if you know of any good tutorials for this. 

 

LED & Beam Shots

The TN42 V2 is using the Luminus SBT 90.2 LED in 5700k with a CRI of 70. This LED is 3V on a single die with a large physical size. It combines high output with high lumens which makes for very high output and far throwing flashlights and in the TN42 V2 that’s exactly what you get. The beam profile that results on the TN42 V2 is a quite small hotspot, a small corona, and a large area of a dim spill. At a couple hundred feet you get a little bit of a donut shape in the very center but this isn’t super noticeable. 

 

Official output specs

 

There was no noticeable PWM with this light.

 

Heat & Runtime

Thrunite lists Turbo 4848 lumens, as lasting for 125 second before stepping down and in my tests it lasted 120 seconds before really starting the ramp down, so pretty close. At 145 seconds it was down to it’s steady 40% of relative output, an estimated 1737 lumens. It maintains this for 2:30:00 before declining down to firefly mode over the next 30 minutes. It will run in firefly for about 2:20:00 until low voltage protection kicks in at 2.89V. Total runtime from turbo to LVP was 5:16:00. FL1 was more like 2:42:00. Maximum heat I saw was at 2 places, First at 51C at 2:20 and then again at the end of output at 2:30:00.

I will throw up another graph here of the relative outputs comparing all 4 batteries to 1 battery so you can see the runtime differences. Realize that the outputs here are not identical but similar. 

 

UI

The UI here is simple and the same as many other Thrunite lights. From Off Long press to go to firefly mode. Once on just short press to turn off. Once on, a long press on the button will cycle the light through the 3 main modes and a short press will turn it off. Double click to go to turbo, and triple click to go to fast strobe. The light does have memory for the main 3 modes. 

 

Recharging & Power

The TN42 V2 uses 4x 4000mAh 21700 sized batteries in a parallel connection. While the batteries that are provided are of the proprietary nature, with positive and negative on the same end of the battery they are not required here. Any button top 21700 thats the correct length will work on this light. Because the light is using batteries in a parallel connection the batteries should be married to the light for safety. 

The included charger is light weight but seems to work just fine over the USB-C connection. I tested with it and a 45w USB-C charger from Aukey and got the same charging time for both. Charging from LVP at 2.89V to full at 4.18V with all for took 8 hours in my testing. Max charging rate I saw was 1.85A, and it will charge via USB-C to C or USB-C PD. While charging the light will work in Firefly and low modes. 

The LED in the center of the button is a power level indicator both when using the light and while charging. Double check the manual for the color codes that are being used here. 

 

Pro’s

  • Giggle Factor
  • Standard button top 21700 batteries work here.
  • Massive amount of Light at a long distance, very useable beam with the spill too

 

Con’s

  • Very large light
  • Expensive
  • I would have liked to see a small bag included to protect the light when not in use and for storage.

 

Conclusion

The Thrunite TN42 V2 has the giggle factor, both in terms of performance and size. It really creates a massive amount of light, with both the spill and long distance. No other LED light I have comes close. The 2 LEP lights I have have a more focused beam but no where near the number of lumens. I have other high lumen lights that create a ton of flood but no where near the distance. My Astrolux FT03S which has the same LED as the TN42 V2 has doesn’t throw as far or is quite as focused. 

While the TN42 V2 is big it’s really the best optimized SBT 90.2 light I have seen and it gets solid life out of the 4x 21700 batteries. It’s impressive both to flashaholics and civilians. While scouting out locations to film my night shots I had people come from the other side of the lake to check this thing out because they couldn’t believe it. 

The TN42 V2 isn’t going to be for everyone due to it’s size and price but if your budget allows, you won’t regret the purchase here. The light definitely would be useful as a search light if you have a lot of land, need to spot animal threats, or for search and rescue tasks. I can definitely recommend it! 

 

Thrunite is running a Coupon till at least 5/18/2021 to save about $80 off the cost of this light. No coupon code needed so if your thinning about this one it’s best to order now to get the best deal.

Thrunite BSS W1 Review (693 Lumens, SST20, 16340 Battery, Onboard charging)

Thrunite has a new light in their BSS (Black Scout Survival) series of lights this time focused on the compact small EDC market. This light produces 693 lumens from an SST20 LED and a 16340 battery. It has a deep carry pocket clip, and is available in two different colored bodies. It’s very similar to the Wowtac W1 I looked at earlier in the year with a few differences. Thanks to Thrunite for sending this too me to look at, if I have a discount for it make sure to check the description below.

 

Watch this review on YouTube: 

Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/liquidretro/ 

Join the Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/LiquidretroReviews/ 

Enjoy this review? Buy me a Coffee/Beer: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/Liquidretro

 

Pickup the Thrunite BSS W1 from Amazon. Don’t forget to apply the Coupon code BSS202012 to get an additional 20% off

BSS W1 Green – https://amzn.to/3c4ra5r 20% off with coupon

W1 Blue – https://amzn.to/3oe0hyt (No extra discount)

 

Packaging & Accessories

Packaging here is a rather small cardboard box that folds up from the top. On the side it lists the option the light is in, interestingly a black version and NW is optional here but those options are not listed for sale currently. Inside you get the light itself, along with a 16340 battery. Mine here happens to say it’s a Wowtac (Sister company) so maybe they had some wrappers leftover? Other accessories include the pocket clip, microUSB to USB cable for charging, manual and a bag of 2 spare orings, 2 spare USB covers. 

 

Construction

The W1 is made from aluminum and at current time is available in an OD Green and a Blue. I like the green color here myself quite a bit. The back end is mostly flat, it has a small milled center thats slightly lower with the Black Scout Survival logo engraved in the center. On mine the logo doesn’t really seem to be lined up at all with the head. The tail is magnetic and pretty strong, it has no trouble holding the weight of the light up. 

The pocket clip attaches at the rear of the light only, it’s a non captured clip and the tail and body are a one piece design. The groves milled into the body section are nice, they give quite a bit of grip but should clean up much better than traditional diamond knurling. The body also tapers in, to give the light the feeling of thinness

The head section of the light is a decent amount larger than the body, especially around the button and USB port area. This does change how the clip fits the light, more on that in a minute. This larger section serves as kind of an anti roll ring. The button is slightly recessed and protected with the aluminum around it. There is a LED underneath to give a charging status. Opposite the button is the charging port. It’s covered with a silicone cover. Not the best design I have seen but effective for the price. The front has a very shallow bezel that’s smooth. It looks to be a 2 piece design but I can’t get it to budge. The lens is anti reflective coated and the reflector does have an orange peel. The LED centering isn’t perfect but this doesn’t seem to have a noticeable effect on the beam.

 

Size & Weight

I measured the length here at 67mm, maximum diameter at 23.22mm at the head, and minimum diameter at the body at 18mm. Weight with the battery and clip was 51.5g. The light is IPX8 water rated.

 

The Competition

The closest light I have to the Thrunite BSS W1 is the Wowtac W1. As you may or may not know Thrunite and Wowtac are sister companies, and these two lights are very similar in terms of physical appearance, design, and shared parts. There are some differences, most obvious is the body tube differences. The Thrunite BSS W1, has in my opinion a more attractive body tube, with its linear milling, it’s also a little slimmer by 2mm. The heads are the exact same design with the only difference being color, and accents. They have the same button, USB Cover, bezel, lens, and reflector. The heads are also interchangeable between lights. 

 

The Olight S1R Baton II and S1 Baton Mini are both smaller then the Thrunite BSS W1, in terms of length, and as far as the mini has very similar maximum performance. One big difference is that the Olights carry bezel up, and the Thrunite is bezel down carry.  

 

Retention

The Thrunite BSS W1 uses a non captured dual direction clip that only fits on the tail of the light. It’s a pretty tight clip, enough so that it does scratch the anodizing, it’s very deep carry which is great and has enough space to fit over the pocket of my jeans to clip onto the pocket. The light also has a small place in the tail to allow a small diameter lanyard to be attached if you wish.

 

LED & Runtime

The Thrunite BSS W1 uses a SST20 LED in Cool White. No tint data is given directly. When I compare the beam to the Wowtac W1 it’s very similar, the SST20 in the Thrunite is slightly more neutral in tint to the Cree G2 in the Wowtac. The beam hot spot is slightly large as well. On this style of light I personally prefer a TIR style optic, because I think it provides a better overall beam for EDC use, that said the traditional reflector design here does throw further. 

 

Thrunite lists the output specs of the BSS W1 as the following.

  • Firefly 0.5 Lumens
  • Low  7.5 Lumens
  • Medium 58 Lumens
  • High 215 Lumens 
  • Turbo 693 Lumens with step down to 215 lumens after 1 min.

 

Heat & Runtime

Turbo runtime on the BSS W1 was 1:15 before step down, relatively short but this is a small light. Past here it seems to follow the curve of a non regulated driver. It ran at 30% relative output for right at an hour before slowly stepping down. Total runtime was 1:43:00 before the light shut off with the battery measuring 2.925v.

 

UI

UI here is extremely simple. From off, long press to enter firefly mode at 0.5 lumens. Once on long press to cycle through the 3 normal modes. Double press to go to turbo, or triple press to go to strobe. There is memory mode here. No lockout mode is here but you can mechanically lock the light out if you wish by a ¼ twist. 

 


Recharging

Recharging is accomplished via MicroUSB onboard the light. The charging port has a small silicone gasket that’s hinged at the top at one point. It’s not the best design I have seen, not the worst either. Charge time took 1:21:00 in my testing, with the max charge rate being .46A which is safe for this small of battery. The fully charged battery measured 4.145V. 

 

Pro’s 

  • Very inexpensive (Less than $30)
  • Only a cool white emitter available at this time.
  • Blue and Green anodizing are available.

 

Con’s

  • Not a crazy amount of performance but it is small.
  • MicroUSB instead of USB-C
  • Bit of a green tint on lower power modes.

 

Conclusion

If you are new to EDCing a flashlight, and wanted to try something small out, this would be a great option to try without breaking the bank. If you just wanted a small flashlight to use on a hat, carry in a bag or purse, or just wanted an impulse buy in a color you liked this fits all those applications here too. 

 

For EDC this is a decent light. The clip design allows for a pretty deep carry which I like, but the head design means I need to pull it out slightly to slip the clip over the side of my pocket. I like that it’s available right away in colors, and that they didn’t wait for a special edition with colors later on. It’s a little disappointing to see that it didn’t go to USB-C for the onboard recharging. 

 

The Thrunite BSS W1 is very similar to the Wowtac W1 that I reviewed last year. The exterior designs are slightly different, and I prefer the Thrunite BSS W1 here. I like the two anodizing colors being offered here an OD green and a nice blue. The SST20 LED is a little brighter than the Cree emitter used in the Wowtac W1. For the minor price difference (Around $25 total price) here between the two models and the availability of body colors, I would say to  buy the Thrunite BSS W1 over the Wowtac W1 at this time but I can’t say you would be wrong choosing either. 

Pickup the Thrunite BSS W1 from Amazon. Don’t forget to apply the Coupon code BSS202012 to get an additional 20% off

BSS W1 Green – https://amzn.to/3c4ra5r 20% off with coupon

W1 Blue – https://amzn.to/3oe0hyt (No extra discount)

Klarus XT11 GT Pro Review (2000 Lumens, Cree XHP 35 HD, USB-C,18650)

Today I have a newer light from Klarus the XT11 GT Pro. This is an update to a light that Klarus has made previously. Klarus (Affiliate) sent this to me earlier in the year for review, and I appreciate their patience as it took me a little while to get to it. 

 

Watch this review on YouTube: 

Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/liquidretro/ 

Join the Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/LiquidretroReviews/ 

Enjoy this review? Buy me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/Liquidretro

 

Pickup the Klarus XT11GT Pro at Amazon https://amzn.to/2MqwsgY

 

Construction

The XT11GT Pro is made from aluminum and is anodized in a smooth medium gloss black anodizing. Visually it’s different then the standard XT11GT. It features the same tactical tail cap, with the large center button being a mechanical switch with a grippy silicon cover and the paddle on the side to allow for mode selection. The paddle was upgraded to aluminum here for incredibility. The clip is a clip on, non fixed and rotates around the body of the light. It’s not deep carry with it leaving about 32mm exposed from a pocket. 

The body is milled with small horizontal lines going around the body of the light and then it has small relieves milled in. It’s a nice change from traditional knurling and provides a good amount of grip. The threads are nice and square cut and it’s a dual wall construction. The head and body tube appear to be once piece. As we get to the head of the light it grows in size, It’s got a built in anti roll ring that adds some style and nicely disguises the USB charging port cover. This is definitely one of the better designs I have seen for this. 

The bezel is a little aggressive and the outer edges have some sharper sides. It’s a gunmetal color and stainless steel I believe. It’s easily unscrewed by hand. Inside is a anti reflective coated glass lens, a fairly deep smooth reflector 

 

Size and Weight

I measured the length at 139mm, minimum diameter on the body at 25mm, maximum diameter on the head at 35mm. Weight with the included battery and clip was 169.2g. 

For an 18650 light it’s a little on the long side, but that’s not unexpected with the deeper reflector. Here are some comparison shots with the light and some others.

 

Retention

Your 2 Retention methods on this light is with the included pocket clip. Unfortunately this isn’t deep carry carry with about 32mm of the light exposed if you do decide to use the clip. With the size of this light that’s ok, as I think it’s more of a bag or coat light myself. The included holster does the job pretty well too, no complaints there. 

 

LED & Beamshots

The XT11 GT Pro is using the Cree XHP 35 HD LED in cool white at 6500k. This is an interesting choice of LED”s since it’s officially been discontinued by Cree. That said plenty of existing stock still exists and Klarus must feel like they have enough to meet the expected demand of this light. The beam it’s self is a good all arounder. The deep smoother reflector means the light has a fairly small hotspot and it throws pretty well but there is also spill to allow for short and medium range light. So a good all around beam. 

The light will run on 18650 batteries which is how I will use it, but it will also run on 2x CR123a batteries which is nice as a backup. As a result the working voltage is 2.8V to 6.4V/ No PWM was observed. 

 

Runtime & Heat

I measured runtime with the included 3100mAh battery. Turbo runtime was 50 seconds before stepping down to 90% and then it ran for another 2 minutes 10 seconds before settling at 30% relative output where it ran for an additional 1:37:00. Total runtime was 2 hours. Max Heat I saw was 42C at 1:35. 

 

UI

Like many of Klarus recent lights this has 2 modes of operation, a Tactical and a Outdoor setting. The tactical mode allows the main button on the rear of the light to go to turbo, and the paddle to be a shortcut for strobe that you can lock on by holding for 2 seconds.

I primarily tested the light in it’s outdoors setting though. When in this setting the primary button on the rear is a shortcut to turbo both as momentary or locked on. Once on you can use the paddle to decrease the modes from turbo, high, Medium, and low. You can also use the paddle when the light is off to start in moonlight mode and then increase in output for each push. It’s a system that works better then I expected and is pretty intuitive once you use and get it.  

 

Recharging

One of the updates the XT11 GT Pro has is USB-C charging. Unfortunately it doesn’t support USB-C to C or USB-C PD charging. So you need to use the supplied (or similar) USB-A to USB-C cable to charge the light. The port cover here is nicely shaped and fits well into the side of the head. It’s one of the better executions I have seen of this in 2020. 

I charged the included 3100mAh battery from LVP to full in a total time of 3:23:10. It wasn’t the fastest charging rate, as the maximum I saw was right at 1A. There is a small LED indicator light built into the side of the light to act as a battery charge state indicator. Green is anything more then 70%, orange is between 30-70%, and red is less then 30%, red flashing is less then 10%. 

Packaging

My light is a super early production light (Serial number 17), and doesn’t have a box so I can’t comment on that. I can tell you the accessories it came with. My light came with a 3100mAh button top protected IMR 18650 battery, a Klarus branded lanyard and a USB-A to USB-C charging cable. It also came with a nylon, Klarus branded holster. It has a Dring and velcro belt loop. It seems to be solidly made. 

 

Pro

  • I like the outdoor UI setting here once you get the hang of it but it’s a little different.
  • Nice size in the hand for an all around light if you want your buttons on the rear.


Cons

  • Seems expensive
  • Cool white only
  • No true moon light mode, lowest is 10 lumen output
  • No USB-C to C compatibility and slow charging

 

Conclusion

My conclusion for the Klarus XT11GT Pro is that it’s a good all around light general purpose light. The 2 UI modes allow you to use it tactically if you want or use it in the outdoor mode which is more appropriate for everyday uses like power outages and camping. The beam is useful with enough throw and spill to do both jobs pretty well. What I don’t care for is the asking price I am seeing at the time of filming. It’s high in my opinion currently. Around $50-60 would make it a good value but at nearly double that I would struggle to pay full price. So if you’re interested I would watch for a sale or coupon. 

Acebeam L35 Review (5000 Lumens, 480M Throw, 21700, TIR Optic)

Today I have Acebeam’s new L35 Tactical Thrower. The one I have here has a Cree XHP70.2 LED capable of 5000 lumens with a throw out to 480 meters. It has a big TIR reflector in it’s short head to create a real wall of light that you will see in my night shots. It’s powered by a 21700 battery too. Thanks to Acebeam for sending this to me and providing a discount if you are interested in this light. More info on that will be in the description below.

 

Watch this review on YouTube: 

Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/liquidretro/ 

Join the Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/LiquidretroReviews/ 

Enjoy this review? Buy me a Coffee/Beer: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/Liquidretro

 

Packaging & Accessories

The L35 comes in a cardboard retail top hanging style packaging. The front shows the light in 1:1 scale with Acebeams black and orange theme. The box has a lot of information on the side and rear panel. There are two versions of this light, one with a Cree XHP 70.2 LED and the other with a LatticePower P70 that isn’t widely available yet (New LED). The light also comes as a kit version with a 21700 battery with onboard USB-C or not. Other accessories that come with all lights are a box of spares (2x O’Rings, 1x tail button), non branded lanyard, standard paperwork and a holster. The holster on mine had a pretty crumpled end, it’s just nylon, no additional padding inside. It’s a fairly tight fit for the light, making me think this isn’t a holster made specifically for this light but one that’s repurposed from another model. 

Construction

The Acebeam L35 shares a lot of characteristics and good build quality traits with the Acebeam L17 I reviewed earlier in 2020. It has the same mat anodized aluminum and nice machining. Starting at the tailcap you have a raised branded Acebeam button, underneath it is a mechanical switch for a full actuation it does require a decent amount of force. A quick 1/8 turn on the tail cap does disable the tail button and side switch. There is a small amount of knurling thats pretty aggressive on the tail. Inside there is a single very stiff spring.

Threads on this light are anodized, square cut, nicely greased and very smooth as a result. Some of the best in the production light category. The tactical ring is aluminum and completely round, it’s removable but you first need to remove the oring in front of it. Below that is a removable pocket clip. The body of the light is glued to the head. It has a milled grip pattern into it and it’s very mild for a tactical light. I do like the look though as it’s kind of a spiral. 

The head has 3 steps before reaching it’s final diameter at the front of the light. There is minimal branding, just the brand, model number and at the back. The side switch is polished and a very tight fit. It’s fairly sensitive but flat. To the left of this at the 9 oclock position there is a LED for a battery indicator and status indicator. The head then grows with the reflector. It’s quite short for it’s diameter and there is the aggressive diamond knurling. At the very front is a pretty aggressive tumbled stainless steel strike bezel. Underneath is a glass lens over top of the TIR plastic reflector. I can see a small molding marks inside inside the reflector but these don’t show on the beam. The center is diffused as well. 

 

Size & Weight

Overall length of the light came in at 152mm. Minimum diameter on the body was 25.42mm, maximum diameter on the head was 54.1mm. I measured the weight with the clip on but without a battery at 166.2g. The light is rated for a 1M drop and is IPX8 rated to 5M. 

 

Retention

As mentioned previously the light does come with a nylon holster that’s Acebeam branded. Mine was kind of crushed at the end in shipping but still works fine. It has very little padding which is ok. There is a dring and fixed belt loop. I question if this holster was made for this light as the velcro doesn’t have full engagement. 

There is also a removable pocket clip on the light that fits below the tactical ring. It’s not fixed and rotates with moderate pressure, I would expect it to rub on the anodizing over time too. The pocket clip here is less for EDC carry in a front pocket but more for clipping on to a vest or something like that. There is a lanyard and the main attachment point is on the tactical ring.

 

LED & Beamshots

My L35 here is running the Cree XHP 70.2P LED in a neutral white at 5000k. Mine has a green tint that’s more noticeable at lower powers and in the corona and spill. Not very surprising to have tint shift on this Cree LED. It’s rated for 5000 lumens, a beam distance of 480 meters at 57,600 candela. There is a LaticePower P70 LED option for this light that is a slight decrease in lumens but an increase in throw by 90 meters. I will be interested to hear more about it when it becomes available as it’s a new LED. You do need a high drain (At least 20A or more) 21700 when running this light to get maximum performance. If batteries are not as high drain the light will start to blink when in turbo mode and step down quickly. 

Mode spacing is pretty good here, as you can see from the table below. It’s nice to see it have a 1 lumen moonlight mode. The jump from high at 1500 to turbo at 5000 sounds like a lot and it is quite a bit. There is no PWM with this light.

 

Heat and Runtime

For my runtimes tests I used an Xtar 4200mAh battery with a max amperage rating of 45A. This light requires a battery capable of 20A or more in order to see it’s top performance. In turbo the light ran for 1:15 before stepping down to about 38% relative output. This was a bit disappointing how fast it stepped down as the difference of 5000 lumens to 1500 lumens is substantial. Here it ran for another 1:10:00 before shutting down with LVP kickin in at 2.966V. I did the same runtime test but only ran it on high and got slightly longer runtime of 1:19:00. This curve was very flat. So at these higher outputs the light has a fairly limited runtime, but the good news is the cure is flat after the initial step down.

Heat was interesting, I had trouble keeping my thermal couple attached to the light, with the small shelf the tape didn’t want to stay attached as well as I hoped in my 3 test. Maybe it’s time for some high temp tape. Max temp I saw before step down was 43C, but during the longer runtimes heat continued to rise to about 55C before it looks like the thermal couple came loose during the last 15 minutes. 

 

UI

The UI is simple to use, you have 2 controls, the eswitch at the front and the instant access to turbo via the mechanical switch in the rear. If you turn the light on with the rear switch, the front switch doesn’t work at all. With the front switch you can simply press to turn on, and then press and hold to cycle between the normal outputs. Double press to go to turbo, and triple press to go to strobe. To lock electronically press and hold for 3 seconds, and the same to unlock or just slightly turn the tail cap. 

 

Pro’s 

  • I like they replaced the eSwitch from the L17 with a Mechanical switch here on the tail.
  • The hotspot is large, not a super long distance thrower.
  • Relatively small and short head given it’s performance.
  • Simple UI. 
  • Takes a standard battery

 

Con’s

  • Strobe isn’t utilizing all the lumens here which is a little odd.
  • Quite a bit of tint shift. 
  • No tail standing
  • Turbo runtime is quite short at just 1:15. 

 

Conclusion

The Acebeam L35 with the Cree XHP 70.2 LED and TIR reflector is an interesting light. It looks tactical, and and with the tail cap only working for turbo it is. It’s a little odd to not find strobe on the tail cap though but it’s not a feature I personally miss. The beam here is interesting as it’s not the throwiest for its, size or power, instead you get a large intense hotspot that goes 480 meters. The LatticePower P70 LED is a little less on peak lumens but throws another 90 meters.  It’s compatible with a remote pressure switch too should you want to run it on a weapon. 

To me it’s not quite a thrower, but definitely on the side of a more tactical then most long distance thrower lights. The beam is pretty useful, since it is larger not nearly as focused as the L17 was. It is on the expensive side but right now for Black Friday Acebeam is running a 30% off sale on this new light to help with that, and that brings it more in line with its competitors. 

Wurkkos HD20 Review (LH325D, 5000k, USB-C PD, 21700, Headlamp)

Last year I did a review on the Wurkkos FC11, and that light has gone on to become one of the most often recommended lights over on /r/flashlight for good reason. Well today Wurkkos has the new HD20 headlamp. It has 2 emitters including high CRI with neutral white, a 21700 battery for long runtime and USB-C charging that supports PD, all for an affordable price. Thanks to Wurkkos for sending this to me to review. 

 

Watch this review on YouTube: 

Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/liquidretro/ 

Join the Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/LiquidretroReviews/ 

 

Pickup the new Wurkkos HD20 on Amazon at https://amzn.to/38IennG 

Discount: Use the code 3F8GNFJO for 20% off also there is a 5% coupon on the page, for a combined 25% off the list price!

 

Packaging & Accessories

Packaging is a plain and simple orange box with just Wurkkos name on it, I suspect this is one they use with other models too as it’s just slightly too small for this light and there are no descriptors on it. Accessories include the light itself, a 4800mAh 21700 button top battery, elastic head strap, 18650 battery adapter, pocket clip, bag of extras including wrist strap, and 2 spare orings, USB-A to USB-C cable, and a manual.

Construction

The Wurkkos HD20 is made from aluminum, and anodized in a semigloss black. I found no issues with the machining on the light. The tail cap is flat and has a strong magnet that allows the light to safely attach on to any surface I have tried it on. There is a lanyard attachment point on the tail cap as well as some straight knurling. The spring inside is short but stiff.

Threads on the body section are square cut and dry. The body tube itself has ripples for grip and reminds me of a larger version of the Prometheus Beta series. There is a place for the clip to attach at both ends and this also where the straps for the head mount live. 

The head itself is quite long and has a good amount going on, the side has a few areas milled out for design, weight reduction and heat dissipation, including a large milled area in the back that’s a bit unique, as is the knurling on the back side of the head. This does give a bit of grip to turn when  mounted up. The USB-C port is covered by a large silicon cover that does fit the contour of the light well. On top is an Eswitch with translucent silicone cover and LED’s under to give an power level reading. It has a blue ring similar to Olight around the switch. This button does sit proud so it can’t headstand.

 

At the front you have the two emitters, The top being the spot, and the bottom being the flood. Both have aluminum bezels around them that look to be screwed in. The top has a TIR optic with glass over top and a flat front. The bottom uses a diffused lens. The light is IPX-68 rated

 

Size and Weight

Maximum length of this light is 122.5mm, maximum diameter at the head is 30mm, minimum diameter on the body is 26.7mm. Weight with the light, battery, and head strap is 202g. For comparison the Acebeam H30 (Also a 21700 light is) 190g. So it’s in the ballpark but a bit heavy.

 

Here are a few comparison pictures with the Acebeam H30.

 

Retention

The strap is made from a silicone material, it’s the loop type that holds the light in place and allows it to rotate up and down. Attached to this is a basic 3 way elastic band. It’s a less expensive headband which is ok for the price here but functional. I found it only moderately comfortable, the entire setup isn’t’ lightweight, so you need it reasonably tight to keep it in place. I found a bit more comfort if I tightened the top strap to let it carry a majority of the weight. 

A pocket clip is an option on this light, but not one I think will be used very often. It can mount on the top of bottom of the battery tube, head down would be the only way I would attempt to carry it due to how much of the head sticks out if mounted the other way. You could use this to mount to a hat with the 2 way clip but I don’t think this will be used much due to the weight and the fact that it’s a right angle light. To me the pocket clip is pretty much useless but nice that it’s included I guess.

LED & Beam

This light uses 2 LED, for 2 different purposes. First you have the Floody beam of the Samsung LH351D in 5000k at 90CRI. This is the bottom emitter on the light and is rated at 700 lumens. The beam it creates is a smooth even flood, it’s everything its described as. Looking inside it looks like it has a TIR style optic with a diffused lens.

The other LED in use here is the Cree XPL HD for the spot emitter. It’s also in 5000k but only at 70 CRI. It’s the larger emitter on top of the light and has a TIR style optic that creates a spot style beam. The spot is reasonably large, with very little spill. Maximum output here is 1300 lumens.

When used together you get a blend of both worlds. The tints here for me matched well enough I couldn’t tell which emitter is which in just tint. The beam shape isn’t perfectly round which isn’t unexpected. If being used as a headlamp it’s a wider than it is tall.

There is PWM in all modes on this light other then moon and Turbo. Below is a sample of what my oscilloscope showed for both emitters on all modes, and then a sample of what each single emitter showed on medium. I don’t notice it with my eye.

 

 

Exact outputs vary with each emitter, the LH351D topping out with 700 lumens, and the XPL HD at 1300. Combined they make 2000 lumens. Here is the runtime chart showing the different outputs for each mode and emitter. 

 

Heat and Runtime

I ran both emitters with the included 4800mAh battery on maximum brightness, and turbo output held peak output for 2 minutes before stepping down to 20% relative output where it cooled down and then began an oscillation with it’s aggressive active thermal controls of regulating the light between 18% relative output and 40%. This goes on for nearly 3 hours, before the last 30 minutes the spike is larger 15% to 70%. The last hour is a linear decrease to zero. Total runtime was right at 4 hours. Max heat was 42.5C at 2:50.

I then did runtimes with each emitter independently. Both were very linear non regulated input for the most part. The flood emitter which is less bright over all (700 lumens) lasted 10:10:00. The spot emitter lasted an impressive 14:31:00. 

 

UI

The basics of this light work like you think, click to turn on, long press to cycle through it’s 3 normal modes. Double press to go to turbo. When off, long pressing turns on moonlight mode. The blinking modes require you first to go to turbo then double click again, double clicking each time to cycle then between strobe, sos, and beacon. A single click exits any of these. A triple click allows you to check battery status via the switch on top. 4 fast clicks enters and exits lockout. 

 

Switching between the LED’s is describe in the manual as when the light is on just hold + click + hold. It sounds easy but in practice I have struggled with getting it right the first, second, or third time when I want to switch, it’s frustrating to say the least. 

 

There has been some talk of minor firmware bugs with memory on BLF threads with this light, to me they have not been obvious enough to spot without reading about them first. It’s not uncommon for a manufacturer to update the firmware without telling anyone on the next production run. The FC11 got a revised firmware very quietly. 

 

Recharging

The light has onboard USB-C charging on the back, and the most exciting part is it’s compatible with USB-C to C and USB-C PD. This is the first headlamp I have tested that’s this way, and it’s fantastic. It only took till late in 2020! 

My recharging test was with the included 4800mAh 21700 battery, This is a standard battery I charged from LVP at 2.737v to Full at 4.123V in 3:21:29 which isn’t too bad for this large of cell. The light charged at 2.1A for the first 1:30:00. 

The light can also be used as a powerbank on some phones. I didn’t log any data when trying this but I can tell you that my Samsung Note 8 charges fine with this light and a C to C cable, but my ipad doesn’t recognize it as a power source. 

 

Pro’s

  • Great value, budget friendly, but good quality, full kit.
  • Neutral white with both emitters and high CRI with the flood, Now only if they would go high CRI with the entire light.
  • Supports USB-C to C charging with PD! First headlamp I have tested to do this. 
  • It also acts as a powerbank for some phones.
  • Strong magnet that has no problem holding up the weight here

 

Con’s

  • Pretty heavy, not small
  • Nice that they included a pocket clip but for me it’s pretty much useless here.
  • Switching between LED’s seems to fail at least 50% of the time, this could be me or just a UI that should be better.
  • The head strap could be higher quality.

 

Conclusion

I think Wurkkos has another hit on their hands with the HD20 if weight or size isn’t a big factor in your decision to buy a headlamp. This ticks a lot of my boxes for a headlamp, the biggest being a neutral white light with a pleasing tint, and at least one high CRI option. The long runtimes here are nice too, but you pay the penalty in size and weight from the 21700 and large head.

The biggest areas I see for improvement is a higher quality head strap that’s a little more comfortable. This isn’t a small headlamp so you notice the weight after a while. After I adjusted the straps to take more weight over my head it got a little better. 

 

It’s so nice to see true USB-C support here, it charges via USB-C to C and USB-C PD. You don’t see a speed increase with PD but that’s ok. Not many flashlights at all price levels support this, and as a result it can even be used as a powerbank if needed. 

 

At the time of filming this is right around the $40 price mark, thats a lot of value and I can recommend the Wurkkos HD20. Right now this is my pick for the best large headlamp to buy for Q4 2020. Wurkkos has offered a 20% discount on this light if you buy it on amazon with the code that’s in the description so make sure you check that out to save a few more dollars. 

 

Pickup the new Wurkkos HD20 on Amazon at https://amzn.to/38IennG 

Discount: Use the code 3F8GNFJO for 20% off also there is a 5% coupon on the page, for a combined 25% off the list price!